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MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

Rosemarie by Adonis FloridesThe Ministry of Education and Culture in Cyprus made great efforts in 2017 to expand the country’s activities in various aspects concerning the cinema, including film production, film education and providing incentives for foreign productions. The launch of the new website Filming in Cyprus is part of this effort.

The Ministry of Education and Culture put in place the Regulation for Funding Programmes for the period 2017-2020. The programmes offer an amount of up to 50 percent of the budget for feature films and up to 60 percent for cross-border productions.

The programmes also offer funding of up to 70 percent for difficult feature films, which are to be filmed in one of the two official languages of the Republic of Cyprus or a combination of the two. For feature films with an extremely low budget (lower than 85,000 EUR), the programme offers a funding of 80 percent. Short films may receive up to 80 percent of the funding.

In 2017 the country hosted a number of international and national feature and short film festivals, the largest being Cyprus Film Days and the International Shor Film Festival of Cyprus (ISFFC). More information about festivals in Cyprus can be found on the Filming in Cyprus website.

Domestic films successfully participated in international film festivals all over the globe. Screenings of Cypriot and European cinematographic works are mainly achieved thanks to the support of the Ministry of Education and Culture. The island steadily produces documentaries and short films, and has an active TV production industry.

Happy Birthday directed by Christos GeorgiouPRODUCTION

Even though funding for film production has been reduced in relation to the years before the financial crisis in 2013, the Ministry of Education and Culture reviewed the regulations for its funding programme for the period 2016-2017 to help with the production of 23 projects with a low budget. The programme approved funding for nine feature fiction scripts and for 14 short films.

The feature films financially supported and coproduced by the Ministry of Education and Culture in Cyprus, which were completed in 2017 are:  Rosemarie, directed by Adonis Florides and produced by AMP Filmworks, Sunrise in Kimmeria, directed by Simon Farmakas and produced by FotoCine Studios Ltd, Happy Birthday, directed by Christos Georgiou and coproduced by Lychnari Productions Ltd, Viewmaster, Twenty Twenty Films and Manny Films, Clementine, directed by Longios Panayi and produced by Roll Out Vision Services in coproduction with Film Blades Filming Solutions, and the documentary Price of a Daughter, directed by Yelis Shukri and produced by Tetraktys Film Productions.

Sunrise in Kimmeria by Simon FarmakasSmuggling Hendrix, directed by Marios Piperides and produced by AMP Filmworks, Sotiris Christou’s White Small Envelopes, produced by Out of Focus, and Tonia Mishiali’s Pause, produced by A.B. Seahorse, are in final stages of postproduction.

Four films are expected to start shooting in 2018: Brothers, directed by Gianna Americanou and produced by Filmblades Ltd, Life Beneath, directed by Alexia Reuters and produced by Filmblades Ltd, The Man with Answers, directed by Stelios Kammits and produced by Felony Films, and The Siege on Liberty Street, directed by Stavros Pamballis and produced by Med Focus (which is a part of Green Olive Films).

Some of the above-mentioned feature films have European coproducers (Greece, Germany, France) and have been supported by Eurimages and the SEE Cinema Network.

DISTRIBUTION

Two films stood out in the international festival circuit in 2017 – Rosemarie by Adonis Florides and Happy Birthday by Christos Georgiou. Both of them were shown at the 58th Thessaloniki IFF. Rosemarie, which was supported by the Ministry of Education and Culture in Cyprus, received there the prestigious Greek Film Critics Association Award and also won the best film award in the main international competition at the 15th International Cyprus Film Days Festival

The independent short film Antidote, directed by Michael Hapeshis, continued to be screened at festivals in Philadelphia, Helsinki, Stockholm and Leuven in 2017. It was also screened at the Sundance Film Festival.

Boy on the Bridge (which received support from the Ministry of Education and Culture in Cyprus), directed by Petros Charalambous and produced by FilmWorks, continued to be successful in 2017. The film won the Audience Award at the 15th International Cyprus Film Days Festival, and it participated in the 7th Julien Dubuque IFF in the U.S., as well as in the 8th Cinema of the Future Society IFF in Albania, where it won best feature film for children and teenagers. It also won best film at the second Buzz Cee International Film Festival in Buzău, Romania, and best director award at the 15th Russian Amur Autumn Film Festival. The main actor in the film, Konstantinos Farmakas, was awarded best actor at the 11th Greek Film Festival in Australia.

Boy on the Bridge by Petros CharalambousThe documentary Beloved Day, directed by Constantinos Patsalides and produced by Walking Around the World in coproduction with the Ministry of Education and Culture, Filmblades, Atlantis and Roll Out Vision Services, premiered at the Umeo International Film Festival in Sweden. The film has secured an agreement for its global distribution.

In general, there are no worldwide distributors specialised in the distribution of domestic films, and usually distribution of domestic films is done via the producer within Cyprus. In the case of coproductions, the release of the film in the respective coproducing countries is handled by either the coproducer or a local distributor.  

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

The main exhibitor in Cyprus is K Cineplex, with two cinemas in Nicosia, one in Larnaca, one is Limassol and one in Paphos.

There is also the Rio cinema in Limassol. The Pantheon in Nicosia has started to screen some mainstream as well as art house films

Other small cinemas in the country are more like film clubs, such as Cinestudio in Nicosia and the Larnaca Cinema Society in Larnaca. These film clubs do not generally show mainstream films.  

GRANTS AND NEW REGULATION

Cinema in Cyprus is governed by the Regulations for the Funding of Programmes to Support Cinematographic Films (2017-2020) under the Ministry of Education and Culture.

According to the Regulations, low budget features may be funded by the ministry with up to 70% (in the category of difficult films) of their budget, to a total of 850,000 EUR.

The Ministry provides up to 595,000 EUR or a percentage of up to 70%, whichever is lower.Price of a Daughter by Yelis Shukri

For high budget films there is no limitation on budget, but priority is given to films with a budget of up to 2,500,000 EUR. The ministry provides up to 850,000 EUR or up to 70 per cent, depending on whichever is lower.

For script development, funding for a fiction film is up to 20,000 EUR, 7,000 EUR for a long documentary, up to 13,500 EUR of funding for a long animated film and up to 4,000 EUR for a short fiction film or short documentary.

The ministry’s funding participation in development is up to 35,000 EUR for a low budget feature, up to 45,000 EUR for a high budget feature and from 15,000 EUR to 35,000 EUR for documentaries and animated films of up to 60 or 90 min.

Continuing its efforts to encourage filmmakers in Cyprus, a country with a population of 850,000, the Ministry announced in 2016 that it would accept applications for a script development grant for low budget feature films and short films. The winners of the grants – amounting to 85,500 EUR for script development for low budget feature films and 239,000 EUR for short film production - which were put in place for the first time since 2013, were approved and contracts were signed in 2017. These include a total of 23 projects, of which 14 are short films.

The ministry provided the means for future or current filmmakers to learn from some of the top professionals in the industry during the Cyprus Film Days and the International Short Film Festival of Cyprus (ISFFC). In 2017 the Cyprus Film Days Festival included a masterclass with cinematographer Phil Meheux BSC and two workshops with director Richard Kwietniowski.

The Cyprus Cinema Guild is also extremely active in offering annual seminars and professional training to its members and to the public. Two institutions in Cyprus, the University of Nicosia and the Frederick Institute of Technology, offer programmes that have to do with education in the fields of the media and audiovisual communication.

TV

There are more than ten studios located in Cyprus and specialised in TV production. Local TV channels usually produce original comic and drama series, and also local sketches.

Smuggling Hendrix by Marios PiperidesLocal TV channels are: Cyprus Broadcasting Corporation (CyBC 1, 2, HD and Sat), Sigma TVTV ONE (previously called Mega One), Ant1, Plus TV, Capital and Alpha TV.

In 2017 the important new domestic series were the comedy La Pasta Pomilori, which was directed by Theodosis Ekonomidis and Antonis Sotiropoulos and broadcast on Ant1, and the period drama Halkina Hronia, directed by Corina Avramidou and Christos Nikolaou and aired on CyBC 1.

There are no local channels broadcasting only films.


CONTACTS:

REPUBLIC OF CYPRUS – MINISTRY OF EDUCATION AND CULTURE
Pause by Tonia MishialiCultural Services
27 Ifigenias Street
2007 Strovolos – Nicosia, Cyprus
Phone: +357 22 809 811
Fax: +357 22 809 873
http://filmingincyprus.gov.cy/
http://www.moec.gov.cy/en/

Report by Maria Gregoriou (2018)
Sources: the Ministry of Education and Culture

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

Toman by Ondřej TrojanCzech cinema had a good year in 2017, with international success of both feature films and documentaries, a film fund effectively supporting the development and production of numerous quality films, a growing number of coproductions, returning international film crews shooting on Czech locations and excellent box office results.

PRODUCTION

Among the most important titles shooting in 2017 were several period films, including Painted Bird / Nabarvené ptáče, directed by Václav Marhoul and produced by Silvescreen, Jan Palach, directed by Robert Sedláček and produced by Cineart TV Prague, and Toman by Ondřej Trojan, produced by Total HelpArt T.H.A..

The long awaited fairy tale The Magic Quill / Čertí brko, directed by Marek Najbrt and produced by Punk Film, was shot in the summer of 2017.

The romantic fantasy based on the acclaimed novel Hastrman, directed by Ondřej Havelka and produced by První veřejnoprávní,, was shot from July to September 2017.

The comedies filmed in 2017 included Dad´s Volha, directed by Jiří Vejdělek and produced by Infinity Prague, and Desperate Women Do Desperate Things / Zoufalé ženy dělají zoufalé věcí directed by Filip Renč and produced by U.F.O. Pictures..

The Magic Quill by Marek Najbrt, photo: Punk Film, Marek NovotnýThere were also numerous foreign productions shooting in the Czech Republic in 2017. Unique Czech locations, the experience and expertise of the Barrandov Studio, which hosts one of the largest costumes and props rental houses in Europe, are constantly attracting big and small productions.

The year 2017 saw a boom of German TV productions shooting on Czech locations. According to Helena Bezděk Fraňková, the Director of the Czech Film Fund, 14 television films and series spent over 33 m EUR / 850 m CZK in nearly 400 filming days in the Czech Republic. “German television productions have in recent years been our most loyal ‘clients’ and Germany clearly surpasses other countries in terms of the number of foreign projects shooting here”, Helena Bezděk Fraňková said.

The eight-part series Das Boot, directed by Andreas Prochaska and produced by Bavaria Fiction, is the biggest German production shot in the Czech Republic since the introduction of incentives in 2010. Stillking Films provided services. Out of the total budget of 25 m EUR, about 14 m EUR were spent at the Barrandov Studio. 

Der Prag Krimi, photo: Schivago FilmOther German productions shot in the Czech Republic in 2017 were: Der Prag-Krimi, directed by Nicolai Rohde and produced by Schiwago Film GmbH, the Charité series, directed by Anno Saul, produced by UFA Fiction for ARD and serviced by Mia Film, and the two-part thriller Walpurgis Night, directed by Hans Steinbichler, produced by Wiedemann & Berg Television GmbH & Co. KG for ZDF and serviced by Czech Wilma Film.

Other important international productions shot in the Czech Republic in 2017 were: the first season of the Genius series, directed by Ron Howard and produced by Fox 21 Television Studios, Imagine Television, OddLot Entertainment and EUE/Sokolow for the National Geographic channel and with Stillking Films providing services; the postwar drama The Aftermath, directed by James Kent and produced by Fox Searchlight Pictures and Scott Free Productions with Sirena Film servicing; Xavier Dolan’s Death and Life of John F. Donovan, produced by Lyla Films and Sons of Manual and serviced by Film United;; Ben Levin’s The Catcher Was a Spy, produced by PalmStar Media, Animus Films, Serena Films, in association with Windy Hill Pictures, with Czech-Anglo Productions servicing, and the two-part film Maria Theresa directed by Robert Dornheim and produced by Maya Production, MR-Film Gruppe (A) and BETA Film GmbH (A).   

Hastrman by Ondřej HavelkaDISTRIBUTION

A total of 26 domestic feature films, two long animated films and 27 documentaries longer than 60 minutes had their premieres in 2017. Of these, 13 are debuts and 20 are coproductions, including six minority coproductions.

Many important feature films released in 2017 were inspired by events and personalities from the Czech history.

Jan Svěrak´s Barefoot / Po strništi bos, produced by Biograf Jan Svěrák Pictures, became the best attended Czech film in 2017. Jan Svěrák returns to the war childhood of his father, Zdeněk Svěrák, and makes a prequel to another extremely popular film of the Svěráks’ tandem, The Elementary School / Obecná škola (1991, Barrandov Film Studio).

A Prominent Patient /  Masaryk, directed by Julius Ševčík and produced by In Film, premiered in the Berlinale Special section of the 2017 Berlin IFF. This drama, focusing on the controversial figure of the Czech Minister of Foreign Affairs Jan Masaryk in the 40´s, was domestically released by Bioscop in the spring of 2017.

Milada, directed by David Mrnka and produced by Loaded Vision Entertainment, was released by Bohemia M.P. in 2017 and is available in numerous language versions on Netflix, which co-funded its production. The film is based on the tragic story of the politician Milada Horáková, who was unjustly sentenced and executed during Stalin's political processes in the 50s.

Little Crusader by Václav KadrnkaThe medieval road movie Little Crusader / Křižáček, directed by Václav Kadrnka and produced by Sirius Films, won the Crystal Globe for best film at the Karlovy Vary Film Festival 2017.

Ice Mother / Bába z ledu, directed by Bohdan Sláma and coproduced by the Czech company Negativ, Slovakia’s Artileria and France’s Why Not Productions, was voted as the Czech Oscar bid in the Foreign Language Film category in 2017. The film was distributed in the Czech Republic by Falcon.

Among the most interesting documentaries in 2017 were Červená by Olga Sommerová and Miroslav Janek´s Universum Brdečka, both produced by Evolution Films and released in cinemas by Aerofilms.

Minority coproductions also had a successful life at festivals. Czech minority coproduction Spoor / Pokot, directed by Agnieszka Holland and produced by TOR Film Production, was awarded the Alfred Bauer Prize for Artistic Contribution at the Berlin IFF 2017.

Cervena by Olga SommerovaLittle Harbor/ Pátá loď, directed by Iveta Grófová and produced by Silverart and endorfilm, won the Crystal Bear for best film of the Children's Jury in the Generation Kplus section of the 2017 Berlin IFF.

Filthy / Špína, directed by Tereza Nvotová and produced by Bfilm and Moloko Film, premiered at the Rotterdam IFF.

There are seven distribution companies in the Czech Republic with a market share of over 1%.

In 2017, Falcon, the distributor of some major US studios’ productions and also high-profile Czech films, had 32.1 % market share and replaced the last year’s top distributor Cinemart, which had 29, 2% market share. Vertical Entertainment (Freeman) ranked third with 16.8%, followed by Bioscoop/AQS with 11.5% market share.

Dads Volha by Jiří Vejdělek, photo: CinemartEXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

The year 2017 was very good for Czech cinemas. Although the results slightly decreased compared with 2016, it was still the second best year in the history of the independent Czech cinema market.

Total admissions were 15,233,432 and total box office was 78,814,200 EUR / 2,004,245,131 CZK, compared to 15,621,923 admissions and 79,081,565 EUR / 2,011,044,198 CZK in 2016.

However, there was a considerable drop of over 10 percent in the admissions to domestic titles, which reached only 20 percent of the total admissions in 2017. 

The most attended Czech film in 2017 was Jan Svěrak´s Barefoot / Po strništi bos with 505,282 admissions and 2.55 m EUR / 64,813,015 CZK gross. The film was distributed by Bioscop.

There were three Czech films in the admissions top ten: Barefoot, the comedy River Rascals / Špunti na vodě directed by Jiří Chlumský, produced by Fresh Lobster in coproduction with Fénix Film, Sibira Pro and Fénix Distribution (distributed by Bioscop), and the 2016´s hit Angel of the Lord 2, directed by Jiří Strach, produced by Marlene Film Production and distributed by Falcon .

Barefoot by Jan SvěrakA total of 284 new releases hit Czech cinemas in 2017, of which 56 were Czech titles.

The average ticket price in 2017 was 5.18 EUR / 131.57 CZK (compared to 5.07 EUR / 128.73 CZK in 2016).

Total admissions top ten is topped by the US animation Despicable me 3 directed by Pierre Coffin and Kyle Balda, with 610,882 admissions and 3.26 m EUR / 82,848,893 CZK gross, followed by Pirates of the Caribbean: Salazar’s Revenge, directed by Joachim Rønning and Espen Sandberg, with 567,665 admissions and 3.25 m EUR / 82, 651,627 CZK gross.

In 2017 the market share of multiplexes, counting 256 screens and 44,464 seats, reached 75.4%. The largest multiplex cinema operators are Cinema City and Cine Star.

Desperate Women Do Desperate Things by Filip RenčGRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

The Czech Film Fund remains the main tool for public support of Czech cinema. The funding is granted in 10 areas: development, production, distribution, promotion, technological development, publications, education and training, festivals and events, protection, preservation and access to film heritage. The fund also supports the activities of film offices in the Czech Republic, helping Czech and foreign filmmakers to shoot in various regions of the country.

In 2017, the Czech Film Fund issued a total of 36 calls for domestic grants with the total funding of 14.6 m EUR / 370 m CZK, of which 11.3 m EUR / 287 m CZK (80%) was earmarked for Czech film development and production of all film genres, including minority coproductions.

The most important films supported in 2017 were: My Sunny Maad, directed by Michaela Pavlátová and produced by Negativ and France’s Sacrebleu Productions (744,000 EUR / 19 m CZK); Šarlatán, directed by Agnieszka Holland and produced by Marlene Film Production (509,000 EUR / 13 m CZK); Opravdoví bratři, directed by Petr Nikolaev and produced by Daniel Severa Production (587,544 EUR / 15 m CZK); Kryštof, directed by Zdeněk Jiráský and produced by Fulfilm (528,790 EUR / 13.5 m CZK) and Jan Palach ,directed by Robert Sedláček and produced by Cineart TV Prague (430,865 EUR / 11 m CZK).

Since the introduction of the new law in 2013, the Czech Film Fund has also administered the Czech incentives scheme. The incentives are granted in the form of a 20% cash rebate on Czech production costs and 66% on the withholding tax on non-resident labor costs paid in the Czech Republic. The incentives are available for feature films, TV and animation series, animated and documentary films. Maximum eligible costs are set at 80% of the total budget.

My Sunny Maad by Michaela PavlátováThe pre-condition of eligibility for the incentive is the minimum volume of the Czech cost:

555,000 EUR / 15 m CZK for a feature, animated or TV film (minimum runtime 70 min.)
74,000 EUR / 2 m CZK for a theatrical documentary (minimum runtime 70 min.)
295,000 EUR / 8 m CZK for a TV episode (minimum runtime 30 min.)
147,500 EUR / 1 m CZK for an animated episode (minimum runtime5 min.)

The amendment to the audiovisual law approved in May 2016 came into effect on 1 January 2017. An improved incentives scheme was introduced, which makes the system more flexible for film productions.

The rebate is no longer subject to a yearly cap. Producers can register the project at any time during the year and immediately receive a registration certificate. Upon receiving the registration certificate, the producer can apply for the allocation of the rebate. The timing of the application is important. Within four months after the application is filed, at least 10 shooting days must be completed in the Czech Republic. Rebates are allotted throughout the year, depending on the beginning of production. For animated films, if shooting in the Czech Republic is longer than 10 days, producers are able to receive their grants in two parts: first upon the completion of the shooting in the Czech Republic and the second part after the completion of all Czech production.

Large amounts of incentives were allotted in 2017 to: Carnival Row (10.3 m EUR /  261 m CZK), directed by Paul McGuigan and Anna Foerster, produced by Legendary Television, Ophelia (1.7 m EUR / 42.6 m CZK), directed by Claire McCarthy and produced by Covert Media (US), Bobker / Kruger Films (US) and Forthcoming Films (UK), both with Stillking Films servicing, and the Czech production Jan Palach (294,000 EUR / 7.5 m CZK), directed by Robert Sedláček and produced by Cineart TV Prague.

The National Film Archive handles both domestic and international sales of films made in Czechoslovakia before 1991 and produced by Barrandov and Zlín film studios (both state owned at the time).

The Czech Film Center is in charge of the promotion of Czech films abroad and is the official national representative of Czech cinema and film industry at key film festivals and markets. The Czech Film Commission is the official film office supporting and promoting audiovisual production in the Czech Republic. Both institutions are a part of the Czech Film Fund.

A Prominent Patient by Július ŠevčíkTV

There are three major TV groups in the Czech Republic, reaching a cumulative market share of approximately 80% in the target group of viewers 15+ in 2017: the public TV Czech Television with a market share of 29.26%, NOVA group with 30.26%, Prima group with 20.76% and Barrandov TV with 8.91%.

TV companies are introducing new channels in order to compensate for the declining audience of flagship stations. The Czech Television currently runs six channels: CT1, CT2, CT24, CT sport, CT:D and CT Art.

NOVA group channels include NOVANOVA 2, NOVA CinemaNOVA Action, NOVA Gold, NOVA Sport and NOVA Sport 2.

Prima group consists of Prima FamilyPrima COOLPrima LOVEPrima ZOOM, new Prima MAX and Prima Comedy.

Milada by David Mrnka, photo: www.loadedvision.comTV stations also increased the number of programmes available on the internet, bringing them to a larger audience. TV NOVA has its video library Voyo.cz, Prima group runs PrimaPlay.cz, while the Czech TV offers its programmes via iVysílání.cz.

The market for TV advertising is dominated by Nova and Prima (90%), while advertising on the Czech Television is limited to a minimum by the law. The television is traditionally the strongest advertising medium in the country.

Television stations play a large role in the production of quality content for local film and TV productions. The Czech TV has become a permanent partner of Czech cinema, with its in-house production sector Film Center coproducing many feature films, including the already mentioned high-profile films Barefoot, Little Crusader, Jan Palach or Garden Store. The Czech TV is also a coproducer of almost all documentaries released in the cinemas.

CONTACTS:

CZECH FILM FUND
Veletržní palác, Dukelských hrdinů 47, 170 00 Prague 7
Little Harbor by Iveta GrofovaPhone: +420 224 301 278
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.fondkinematografie.cz

NATIONAL FILM ARCHIVES
Malešická 12, 130 00 Prague 3
Phone: +420 778 522 729
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.nfa.cz

APA- AUDIOVISUAL PRODUCERS’ ASSOCIATION
Národní 28, 110 00 Prague 1
Phone: +420 603 844 811
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.asociaceproducentu.cz

CREATIVE EUROPE – MEDIA CZECH REPUBLIC
Národní 28, 110 00 Prague 1
Phone: +420 221 105 209
Fax: +420 221 105 303
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.mediadeskcz.eu

CZECH FILM AND TELEVISION ACADEMY
Karlovo nám 285/19, 120 00 Prague 2
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.cfta.cz

CZECH FILM CENTER
Národní 28, 110 00 Prague 1
Phone: +420 221 105 303
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.filmcenter.cz

CZECH FILM COMMISSION
Národní 28, 110 00 Prague 1
Phone: 420 778 543 290
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.filmcommission.cz

Spoor by Agnieszka HollandINSTITUTE OF DOCUMENTARY FILM
Štěpánská 611/14, 110 00 Praha 1
Phone: +420 224 214 858
Fax: +420 224 214 858
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.dokweb.net

FITES – CZECH FILM AND TELEVISION UNION
Pod Nuselskými schody 3, 120 00 Prague 2
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
www.fites.cz

FILM DISTRIBUTORS’ UNION
nám. Winstona Churchilla 2, 130 00 Prague 3
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , www.ufd.cz 

Report by Denisa Strbova (2018)
Sources:  the Czech Film Fund, the Czech Film Center, the Czech Film Commission, the Film Distributor´s Union

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

The Dissidents by Jaak KilmiEstonian cinema had a successful year in 2017 and continued to break records. Total admissions reached an all-time high of 3.51 m, a 6.3 percentage-point increase from 2016. Another record is 2.67 admissions per capita. Total box office reached a record of 19.39 m EUR, with 9.1 percentage points more than in 2016.

Domestic films had 282,421 admissions, adding up to an 8% market share. The Dissidents, directed by Jaak Kilmi and produced by Taska Film, topped the box office with 85,306 admissions and over 480,000 EUR gross.

Enterprise Estonia, the country’s industry development agency, supported two creative industry initiatives with a total of 522,063 EUR to be spent over the next two years.

PRODUCTION

In 2017 major production of feature films for the centennial film programme Estonian Republic 100 took place. Most of the premiere dates are already scheduled.The Little Comrade by Moonika Siimets

The Little Comrade, directed by Moonika Siimets and produced by Amrion, was shot in August 2016-June 2017 and is set to be released on 15 March 2018.

The Riddle of Jaan Niemand, directed by Kaur Kokk and produced by Homeless Bob Production, was shot in March-June 2017 and will premiere on 5 October 2018.

Truth and Justice, directed by Tanel Toom and produced by Allfilm, started filming in April 2017 and will wrap in August 2019, with the domestic premiere scheduled for 2019.

Lotte and the Lost Dragons, the third instalment of Estonia’s most famous animated franchise and the only animated feature in the centennial film programme, directed by Janno Põldma and Heiki Ernits and produced by Eesti Joonisfilm, will wrap production in early 2018. The film will reach the screens in 2019.

Take It or Leave It, directed by Liina Trishkina-Vanhatalo and produced by Allfilm, will finish production in January 2018. The release is planned for September 2018.

The Riddle of Jaan Niemand by Kaur KokkThe last Estonian Republic 100 film to enter production is Eia's Christmas at Phantom Owl Farm, directed by Anu Aun and produced by Luxfilm and Kinosaurus Film. Principal photography is due to begin in January 2018 with the premiere set for December 2018.

Other films wrapped production in 2017.

Estonian minority coproduction Scary Mother, directed by Georgian Ana Urushadze and coproduced by Allfilm, has already collected nine awards at international film festivals since its premiere in August 2017.

The Finnish/Estonian/Swedish coproduction The Eternal Road, directed by AJ Annila and coproduced by Taska Film, received the first ever FilmEstonia cash rebate support and premiered in August 2017 in Finland and December 2017 in Estonia. The film was in the Official Selection of the Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival.

The Confession aka The Monk by Academy Award nominated director Zaza Urushadze, an Estonian/Georgian coproduction produced by Allfilm, was finished and premiered in 2017.

The Estonian/Russian coproduction Green Cats, directed by Andres Puustusmaa and produced by Leo Production, was finished in 2017 with the premiere set for 12 January 2018.

Scary Mother by Ana UrushadzeThe Swan, directed by Ása Helga Hjörleifsdótir, is a coproduction between Iceland, Germany and Estonia (Kopli Kinokompanii), set to hit Estonian cinemas in January 2018.

Class Reunion 2: Wedding and Funeral, the sequel to the 2016 film still holding the box office record in Estonia, directed by René Vilbre and produced by Taska Film, was also finished in 2017 with the premiere scheduled for 13 February 2018.

Portugal, directed by Lauri Lagle and produced by Allfilm, which won the First Look main award along with postproduction support in Locarno, will be domestically released on 5 April 2018.

The Estonian/French/Belgian coproduction Fire Lily, directed by Maria Avdjuško and produced by Meteoriit, will open in May 2018. The film, starring the Hollywood-based Estonian-born actor Johann Urb, was shot in November-December 2017.

Morten and the Spider Queen, a long animated film directed by Kaspar Jancis and coproduced by Estonia’s Nukufilm, Ireland’s Telegael, Belgium’s GRID VFX and UK’s Calon, finished production at the end of July 2017 and it set to open in 2018. Its English version will be voiced by Ciaran Hinds and Brendan Gleeson among others.

Morten and the Spider Queen by Kaspar JancisMihkel, directed by Ari Alexander Magnusson and coproduced by Iceland’s True North and Estonia’s Amrion, was shot in Estonia for five days in May-June 2017, after an Icelandic shooting in the autumn of 2016. The film is set to premiere on 24 August 2018.

Rain, a debut feature directed by Janno Jürgens and produced by Alasti Kino, was shot over several periods from August 2017 to February 2018, and will premiere in late 2018.

 

Truth and Justice by Tanel ToomThe Last Ones, directed by Veiko Õunpuu and produced by Estonia’s Homeless Bob Production and Finland’s Bufo, was shot in August-November 2017 and will premiere in 2019.

The recipients of the FilmEstonia cash rebate grants in 2017 are: the animated series Bibi Blocksberg, directed by Aina Järvine and produced by A Film Eesti, the TV series Bordertown, directed by Miikko Oikkonen, Jyri Kähönen, Juuso Syrjä and produced by Amrion, and the long animated film Checked Ninja, directed by Anders Matthesen, Thorbjørn Christoffersen and produced by A Film Eesti.

DISTRIBUTION

A total of 355 films were distributed in Estonia in 2017. The average ticket price was 5.53 EUR, a 2.3 percentage point increase year on year from 2016. The largest number of titles, 179, originated from Europe. The US came second with 111 films.

Swingers by Andrejs EkisA total of 21 Estonian Films premiered in cinemas through 2017 and two of them made it to the top ten. The Dissidents, directed by Jaak Kilmi and produced by Taska Film, ranked 2nd, while Swingers, directed by Andrejs Ekis and produced by Platforma Film, ranked 7th.

In March 2017, the first ever Estonian Film & Television Awards ceremony was held with The Days That Confused by Triin Ruumet, produced by Kinosaurus Film, bringing home the majority of the film awards, six in total, including Best Film and Best Director. Livia Ulman and Andris Feldmanis won Best Screenplay for Pretenders by Vallo Toomla, produced by Amrion, Jaagup Roomet won Best Production Design for The Polar Boy by Anu Aun, produced by Luxfilm, and Tiina Mälberg won Best Film Actress for Mother by Kadri Kõusaar, produced by Meteoriit.

The Days That Confused by Triin RuumetEXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Total admissions reached an all-time high of 3,510,932, a six percent increase from 2016. Another record is 2.67 admissions per capita. Total box office reached a record of 19,399,483 EUR, 9.1 percent more than in 2016.

Rain by Janno JürgensDomestic films had 282,421 admissions, adding up to an 8% market share. The most successful Estonian film was The Dissidents, which made box office No 1 with 85,306 admissions and over 480,000 EUR gross.

The distribution market was dominated by ACME Films with 36% and Estonian Theatrical Distribution with 30% of market share. Forum Cinemas in the third place had 22% of the market share.

 

GRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

In 2016, the annual state support for film industry was 9,877,146 EUR with 7,025,151 EUR from the Estonian Film Institute, 2,141,995 EUR from the Cultural Endowment, and 710,000 EUR from the Ministry of Culture.

In 2017, the Estonian Film Institute provided production and postproduction grants for the following feature films and minority coproductions: The Dissidents directed by Jaak Kilmi; The Man Who Looks Like Me, directed by Katrin Maimik and Andres Maimik and produced by Kuukulgur Film; The Last Ones directed by Veiko Õunpuu; Mihkel directed by Ari Alexander Magnusson; Man Wanted, directed by Irida Zhonga and produced by Nukufilm; The Man Who Surprised Everyone, a Russian/French/Estonian coproduction coproduced by Homeless Bob Production, directed by Natalya Merkulova and Aleksey Chupov; Rain directed by Janno Jürgens; Sandra Gets a Job, directed by Kaupo Kruusiauk and produced by Kopli Kinokompanii; Class Reunion 2: Wedding and Funeral directed by René Vilbre; Green Cats directed by Andres Puustusmaa, and Fire Lily directed by Maria Avdjuško.

In 2017, the budget of Estonia’s cash rebate system FilmEstonia, targeted at foreign feature and quality TV productions, reached 1 m EUR. Estonia’s cash rebate allows for reimbursement of up to 30% of locally incurred costs. The system imposes a 1 m EUR minimum budget threshold for feature films and 2 m EUR for animated films, as well as minimum requirements for local spend (200,000 EUR for feature films, 100,000 EUR for animated films).The Eternal Road by AJ Annila

Estonia’s cash rebate system supported three projects with the amount of 118,279 EUR in 2017.

In 2017, Enterprise Estonia, the country’s industry development agency, supported two audiovisual infrastructure initiatives with a total of 522,063.90 EUR, to be spent within three years.

Creative industries development centre Creative Gate received 300,000 EUR to create an international platform as a gateway for film and audiovisual industry in collaboration with creative and service sector partners. The central export marketing channel of Creative Gate is the annual Industry@Tallinn, a part of the Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival.

Storytek Accelerator (which received 222,063.90 EUR) brings together deep audiovisual sector knowledge, technology and funding with a selection of hand-picked tech entrepreneurs and content creators. Storytek helps creatives, producers and early stage companies to develop business, fast track their content projects, products and services to the global markets and access finances during a challenging 10-week programme held twice a year in Tallinn, Estonia.

The new building of the Estonian Film Museum was opened in October 2017.

On 27-28 November 2017, the Estonian EU Presidency Conference Pictured Futures: Connecting Content, Tech & Policy in Audiovisual Europe was organised by the Ministry of Culture in collaboration with Estonian Film Institute, Tallinn Black Nights Film Festival and the European Commission. The event was co-financed by the European Commission and Enterprise Estonia

The Confession by Zaza UrushadzeTV

There are three main TV broadcasters in Estonia. The Estonian Public Broadcasting operates three channels: the flagship ETV, the culturally oriented ETV2 and the recently launched Russian-language ETV+, that is yet to capture a sizeable audience of Estonia’s Russian-speaking minority. The two leading commercial broadcasters are Kanal2 and Viasat-owned TV3, both of which also beam a host of niche channels.

The 10-part TV drama series The Bank / Pank, which won a production grant from the centennial film and TV programme, started production and is planned to air in the autumn season of 2018. Itamambuca is producing on a more than 1.5 m EUR budget - more than 10 times the regular Estonian TV series.

CONTACTS:

ESTONIAN FILM INSTITUTE
Uus 3, Tallinn 10111
Phone: +372 627 60 60
Fax: +372 627 60 61
www.filmi.ee
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The Riddle of Jaan Niemand by Kaur KokkCULTURAL ENDOWMENT OF ESTONIA
Suur-Karja 23, Tallinn 10148
Phone: +372 699 9150
www.kulka.ee
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ESTONIAN ANIMATION UNION
Roo 9, Tallinn 10611
Phone: +372 646 4299
Fax: +372 646 4299
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Contact: Rao Heidmets

ESTONIAN DOCUMENTARY GUILD
Vilmsi 53g, 10147 Tallinn
www.dokfilm.ee
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ESTONIAN FILMMAKERS UNION
Uus 3, Tallinn 10111
Phone: +372 646 4068
www.kinoliit.ee
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Contact: Kadri Vaas

ESTONIAN NATIONAL PRODUCERS UNION
Uus 3, Tallinn 10111
Phone: +372 5825 8962
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Contact: Aet Laigu

ESTONIAN FILM INDUSTRY CLUSTER
Phone +372 5343 6863
www.filmestonia.eu
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Contact: Karin Reinberg-Šestakov

ESTONIAN SOCIETY OF CINEMATOGRAPHERS ESC
www.esc.edicypages.com/et

THE ASSOCIATION OF PROFESSIONAL ACTORS OF ESTONIA
Uus 5, Tallinn 10111
Phone: +372 646 4517
Fax: +372 646 4516
www.enliit.ee
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THE ESTONIAN ASSOCIATION OF FILM JOURNALISTS
Narva mnt 11e, Tallinn 10151
Phone: +372 669 8210
Fax: +372 669 8154
www.filmikriitik.ee
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Contact: Andrei Liimets

THE UNION OF ESTONIAN FILM CLUBS
Vikerlase 13-62, Tallinn 13616
Phone: +372 632 4662; +372 55 46042
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Contact: Raivo Olmet

ESTONIAN FILM MUSEUMThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pirita road 56, 10127 Tallinn
Phone: +372 6 968 600; +372 5620 8875
http://www.ajaloomuuseum.ee/en/filmmuseum
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Contact: Maria Mang

ESTONIAN FILM DATABASE
Koidu 17-1, 10137 Tallinn
Phone: +372 6015982
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www.efis.ee/en 

ESTONIAN FILM ARCHIVES
Ristiku 84, Tallinn 10318
Phone: +372 693 8613
www.filmi.arhiiv.ee/index.php?lang=eng
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Report by Leana Jalukse (2018)
Sources: Estonian Film Institute, Cultural Endowment of Estonia, Estonian Ministry of Culture

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

Grandpa Is More Dangerous than the Computer by Varis BraslaAhead of Latvia's Centennial, which will be celebrated throughout 2018, the support for local film production steadily increased to 9,109,016 EUR in 2017, with more than 2 m EUR increase compared to 2016. Film production has taken a more robust path due to the Latvian Films for Latvian Centenary special programme, consisting of 16 feature films.

Total state support for the industry in 2017 was 9,109,016 EUR, including approximately 6 m EUR as production support for 42 films.

For the second consecutive year, two domestic films are among top 10 most watched movies in Latvia. There were 16 domestic premieres in 2017, of which the most successful was Varis Brasla's family film and comedy Grandfather Is More Dangerous than the Computer with 76,068 admissions and 281,029 EUR gross. Andrejs Ekis’ comedy Swingers, which was released at the end of 2016, ranked number seven.

PRODUCTION

Domestic films continued to steadily grow, as an unprecedented state support was given to the production of films in the Centennial programme.

A total of 15 feature films were in production in 2017, as well as nine animated films and 18 documentaries.

One of the most expensive productions, the historic drama The Pagan King, directed by Aigars Grauba and produced by Platforma Filma, wrapped at the end of 2017. Another major action drama, Blizzard of Souls / Dvēseļu putenis, directed by Dzintars Dreibergs and produced by KultFilma, was also shot in 2017.

Madara Dišlere's feature film Paradise '89 (produced by Tasse Film) is set at the time when Latvia regained its independence.

Swingers by Andrejs EkisMistrus Media produced three films in 2017: Ivars Seleckis' documentary To Be Continued (about several 7 year old children and their life), Gints Grūbe's documentary Lustrum (about KGB archives) and Dāvis Sīmanis' feature film The Mover (produced by Mistrus Media) about Žanis Lipke, who sheltered Jews during the Nazi occupation.

DISTRIBUTION

A total of 295 films were distributed in 2017.

The leading distribution companies in the country are regional Baltic distributors: Forum Cinemas, Latvian Theatrical Distribution, Acme Film and Topfilm Baltic.

Local distribution is also handled by Kinopunkts, that screens films in more than 100 locations outside traditional cinemas. The project is supported by the National Film Centre and the Culture Capital Foundation of Latvia.

Small cinema initiatives focusing on the distribution of independent and art house films, such as Kino Bize and Kino Spektrs, which emerged in 2014 and 2015, continued their activity in 2017.

The internet platform Filmas, the biggest Latvian film database launched in 2015, provides a catalogue of more than 2,500 films, going back to the 1920s. Approximately 120 films are free of charge, but for the time being only on Latvian devices, due to distribution rights. The project is supported by the National Film Centre of Latvia in cooperation with the Riga Film Museum and the Culture Information Systems Centre.

Two commercial platforms, Shortcut and Viaplay, offer film streamings, including domestic premieres.

The 4th Riga International Film Festival took place from 7 to 17 September 2017. Estonian director Rainer Sarnet’s November, an Estonian/Polish/Dutch coproduction between Estonia’s Homeless Bob Productions, Poland’s Opus Film and the Dutch company PRPL, was awarded Best Feature Film. The national award at the Lielais Kristaps National Film Festival went to Chronicles of Melanie, directed by Viestur Kairish and produced by Mistrus Media. The annual short film festival 2 Annas took place from 28 November to 3 December 2017.

The Pagan King by Aigars GraubaEXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Latvia had 23 cinemas in 2017 (including 4 multiplexes) with 61 screens, of which 25 are 3D screens.

The average ticket price is 5.19 EUR.

In 2017 admissions were 2,476,951 and box office was 12,860,497 EUR.

Domestic films had 194 083 admissions, adding up to a 7.83% market share, which is a slight growth from 7,38% in 2016.

There were 16 domestic premieres in 2017. Among them are Varis Brasla's family film and comedy Grandfather Is More Dangerous than the Computer, produced by Studio F.O.R.M.A., which was the first film from the Latvian Films for Latvian Centenary programmme to be finished. Grandfather Is More Dangerous than the Computer was the most popular domestic movie in 2017 with more than 75,000 admissions and also the most successful domestic family film in the opening week with over 13,000 admissions. The film is domestically distributed by its production company, while Rija Films is handling the sales.

Ieva Ozolina's documentary Solving My Mother (produced by FA Filma), which won the 2017 IDFA First Appearance Special Jury Award, hit the domestic cinemas only at the beginning of 2018, but Janis Nords' relationship drama Foam at the Mouth (produced by Tasse Film) and the Latvian/Norwegian documentary Liberation Day (produced by VFS Films), about the famous band Laibach’s visit to North Korea, were released in 2017.

A total of 267 international films were released in 2017, compared to 276 in 2016.

Foam at the Mouth by Janis NordsThe most successful films in 2017 were: Despicable Me 3 (128,336 admissions), Grandpa Who Is More Dangerous Than the Computer (76,068 admissions), Boss Baby (76,017 admissions), The Fate of the Furious (72,813 admissions), Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales (69,774 admissions), Fifty Shades Darker (63,631 admissions), Swingers (58,560 admissions), Emoji Movie (52,576 admissions), Smurfs: The Lost Village (51,038), Cars 3 (46,494 admissions).

GRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

The National Film Centre is the main film institution in Latvia. It serves as the primary source of funding for local films. The grants contest is held annually, although separate tenders regarding different stages of project development are announced throughout the year.

Total state support for the industry in 2017 was 9,109,016 EUR, including approximately 6 m EUR as production support for 42 films.

Additionally, 748,000 EUR were given to seven international coproductions, of which five are coproduced by Tasse Film. All the seven titles are Latvian minority coproductions.

Five Latvian productions received funding from Eurimages, totalling 557,000 EUR.

In 2017 the Riga Film Fund, which offers a cash rebate of up to 20% of all production costs, approved four co-financing agreements for a total amount of 686,509 EUR for six minority coproductions.

Among the projects that received co-financing agreements in 2017 were three coproductions handled by Tasse Film and two by Forma Pro Films. The largest rebate was granted to Film Angels Production for Age of Iron, directed by Philippe Berenger, that is a coproduction with France's Slot Machine. The rebate is 135,718 EUR, representing 20% of the costs of shooting in Latvia.

Paradise 89 by Madara DišlereLatvia has a range of diverse filmmaking locations, including medieval, Art Nouveau and 19th century wooden architecture, therefore urban as well as natural locations in Latvia are able to double for many European places. Latvia is home to the Cinevilla Film Studio, located 50 km from the national capital Riga and providing opportunities for shooting, as well as its own hotel.

The Latvian Film Producers Association with its approximately 30 members represents the most important film professionals association in Latvia. The Latvian Filmmakers Union, which was established in 1962, also represents local filmmakers. An important role in the region is played by the Films Service Producers Association, whose members include, among others, the Latvian Film Angels Studio, Baltic Pines film studio and Ego Media. These entities have a vast experience in handling foreign productions shooting in Latvia.

TV

The leading broadcaster in Latvia is the commercial channel TV3. Along with the LNT channel, it was purchased in 2017 by the investment company Providence Equity Partners from its previous owner Modern Times Group.

The public broadcaster LTV is funded by the state and also through advertising revenues. The Latvian Television organises an annual film project The Code of Latvia / Latvijas kods, focusing on stories about contemporary life in Latvia. The project is implemented in cooperation and with the support of the National Film Centre of Latvia and the Culture Capital Foundation. New episodes are presented every year in November as a part of Latvian Independence Day celebrations.

LTV, which is also a TV film producer, produced mostly documentaries in 2017. Red Book, a new historic drama TV series, was in production in 2017 and is set to be aired in 2018 as part of Latvia's Centennial celebration. The series is coproduced with Red Dot Media.

CONTACTS:

NATIONAL FILM CENTRE OF LATVIA
Peitavas 10, Riga, Latvia, LV-1050
Phone: +371 7358878
Fax: +371 7358877
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www.nkc.lv
Director: Dita Rietuma


RIGA FILM FUND
Phone: +371 6703 7659
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www.filmriga.lv

Chronicles of Melanie by Viesturs KairišsCULTURE CAPITAL FOUNDATION
Phone: +371 6750 3177
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.kkf.lv


LATVIAN FILM PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION
President: Aija Berzina
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Mobile: +371 26466014

LATVIAN FILMMAKERS UNION
Chairman: Ieva Romanova
Elizabetes Str.49, Riga
LV-1010, Latvia
Mobile: +371 29696874
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FILM SERVICE PRODUCERS ASSOCIATION OF LATVIA
Kr. Valdemara 33-10, Riga, LV-1010, Latvia
Phone: +371 67331921
Mobile: +371 25666698
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.filmservice.lv


MINISTRY OF CULTURE
Phone: +371 6707 8137
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.km.gov.lv

Report by Zane Peneze (2018)
Sources: Film Riga, the National Film Centre of Latvia, the Latvian Television

 

Maneland by Peter Sant, credit: Michael GaleaMARKET ANALYSIS 2016

Malta saw a somewhat quieter year in 2016, albeit still managing to attract a few names and productions of note, and making significant steps towards the establishment of film as a medium of indigenous creative expression, artistic appreciation and academic inquiry.

 

PRODUCTION

Local film production saw two feature films made and benefiting from financial incentives from the Malta Film Commission: Peter Sant’s Maneland, an allegorical film about a king who lives with his three daughters in an island bunker, and Mark Doneo’s The Weeping House of Qala produced by his own Mad Movies Productions, a ghost story based on an urban legend about a dilapidated house.

U-Film resumed work on their miniseries entitled The Mystery of the Brittanic, completing episodes 2, 3 and 4, with Evgeny Tomashov and Sergey Veksler taking turns in the director’s chair. The same company also serviced Bulgarian director Javor Gardev’s Ikariya, a Russian sci-fi thriller based on the myth of Daedalus and Icarus.

Lana Wachowski brought Daryl Hannah and the rest of the Sense8 cast to shoot a special episode of the Netflix series, which was serviced by Pearly Gates. Another key figure, Gabriele Salvatores, filmed parts of Indigo Film and Rai Cinema’s Invisible Boy 2 / Il Ragazzo Invisible: Fratelli, with Valeria Golino. Latina Pictures took care of the shoot in Malta.

The largest foreign production was a retelling of the 1976 hijacking and subsequent rescue in the eponymous Entebbe, with José Padilha (Bus 174, RoboCop) calling the shots, and featuring Rosamund Pike and Daniel Brühl. Pellikola serviced the production for Working Title Films. Another remake, Papillon, brought Charlie Hunnam and Rami Malek to Malta for a five-day shoot in the tanks at Malta Film Studios and at a cliff-side location. Red Granite pictures appointed the Producer’s Creative Partnership, which handled the production with Twenty13.

Schiwago Film and Amour Fou steered Wolfgang Fischer’s Styx towards Malta, filming in open water around the islands, and using the storm generation facilities at Malta Film Studios. Starring Susanne Wolff and Gedion Wekesa Oduor, the film narrates the transformation of a strong woman on a solo sailing trip. Small Island Films took charge of operations in Malta, again in collaboration with Twenty13.

A mini-series based on the 1996 Yohan migrant tragedy, The Ghosts of Portopalo / I Fantasmi di Portopalo, again used the aquatic facilities at MFS. With Beppe Fiorello in the lead, the Picomedia production teamed up with the Producer’s Creative Partnership.

The Mystery of Britannic seriesTelevision series constituted a significant percentage of productions that used Malta as a base for any length of time. Paul Parker handled the Smithsonian Channel and ZDF-backed Warrior Women: The Gladiatrix Episode for Urban Canyons. Katrina Samut-Tagliaferro in turn took care of the Christmas Special for the long-running BBC series Birds of a Feather, featuring Pauline Quirke and Linda Robson. The Bravest / Danmarks Modigste, a large-scale endurance game show produced by Copenhagen-based Mastiff A/S, used the deep-water tank at the MFS as a set in itself, along with several other locations around Malta. Specialist Rock Productions helped make it happen.

Stargate Studios Malta, the key VFX provider in Malta, kept the ball rolling with three substantial jobs. The Embassy / La Embajada extended Stargate’s long-running relationship with Spanish studios, recreating Thailand on a Spanish set for Bambú Producciones. Canada-based Leif Films returned to the company with a work order for two biblical films: Joseph and Mary with Kevin Sorbo and Lara Jean Chorostecki in the lead roles, and The Apostle Peter: Redemption with familiar faces of John Rhys-Davies as Peter and Stephen Baldwin as Nero.

DISTRIBUTION

Rebecca Cremona’s Simshar kept on travelling with screenings in the UK in conjunction with We Are beyond Cinema, and in France with Visiosfeir Distribution. Festivals took the film to Chicago, New York, Leuven, France, Naples, Nice, Stockholm, Prague, Annaba, Zagora, Ashdod, New Delhi, Dubai, Singapore, and Trinidad and Tobago. And in time for the holiday season, the film made it to DVD.

Simshar’s online presence in the US and Canada spread to several networks including iTunes, Xbox, Amazon, Google Play, Time Warner Cable, AMC and the Sundance Channel, some of which made the film available to subscribers in Europe. The film was also picked up by regional networks like the Croatian B.net, Du in Dubai, OTE TV in Greece, MTN in South Africa, CableNet in Cyprus, SBB in Serbia, Solo in Nigeria and Telekom Slovenije.

GRANTS AND LEGISLATION

The Ministry of Tourism, under whose remit falls the Malta Film Commission, launched the first National Film Policy in January 2016, amid criticism that whilst a step in the right direction and inviting discussion on the preservation of film heritage, it did not go far beyond generic statements.

Released after a consultative process launched in the last quarter of 2015, the document assessed the current situation in the servicing industry, the local production situation, and the education possibilities available, making fairly generic forward-looking statements in each case. In particular, the report identified anomalous employment conditions in the servicing industry, particularly with the long hours crews were expected to work, but took a cautious approach in advocating changes.

The Malta Film Fund opened its yearly call in April and distributed 230,914 EUR in funds, split as follows:

Section Number of Projects Total Funds Awarded
Writers’ Grant 1 4,945 EUR
Development Grant 1 30,000 EUR
Production Grant: Short Films, New Talent - -
Production Grant: Short Films 4 75,969 EUR
Production Grant: Feature Films 1 120,000 EUR

 

On the occasion of Malta’s Presidency of the Council of the European Union in 2017 and Valletta’s tenure as European Capital of Culture in 2018, the Film Fund launched a surprise call in August 2016, making a further 250,000 EUR available albeit for production only. Results are expected to be released in February 2017. In conjunction with Arts Council Malta, Malta Film Commission also announced in December the intention to introduce Distribution Support in 2017.

Simshar by Rebecca CremonaUniversity of Malta's Master of Arts in Film Studies programme, funded by the Ministry of Tourism and the Malta Film Commission, saw first films made under the tutorship of Antonio Piazza and Fabio Grassadonia (writer-directors of Salvo, 2013 Grand Prix winner at the Semaine de la Critique), Scott Graham (writer-director of 2012 BAFTA-nominated Shell) and cinematographers Francesco Di Giacomo and Federico Angelucci. Robin Hardy gave a masterclass and presented the restored version of his acclaimed 1973 film The Wicker Man, his last public appearance before passing away in July 2016.

The sophomore edition of the Valletta Film Festival, with the support of the Malta Film Commission, had Sir Alan Parker as its patron, presenting a screening of Midnight Express (1978) in the same location it was filmed in. Jurors Carolina Hellsgard, Cosmina Stratan, Tamer El Said, Valery Rosier and Brontis Jodorowsky selected Måns Månsson’s The Yard as best film, and Laila Pakalnina, Yves Jeanneau and Hrönn Marinósdóttir laurelled Pablo Iraburu and Migueltxo Molina’s Walls as best documentary. Sidebar events included an international conference on the Cinema of Small European Nations.

Arts Council Malta, through its Culture Partnership Agreement, awarded funds for a three-year period to the Film Grain Foundation as organisers of the Valletta Film Festival, to Kinemastik (Kinemastik Short Film Festival) and to the Malta Film Foundation (Malta Short Film Festival).

TV

Malta has nine television channels, two of which are state-owned (TVM, TVM2), two are run by the main political parties (ONE, Net), and the rest are private. Three of the private channels have a General Interest Objectives licence (Smash TV, f Living, Xejk), and the remaining two (iTV, Owners’ Best) are teleshopping channels. The national regulators are the Malta Broadcasting Authority for content and the Malta Communications Authority for matters related to transmission and the service providers.

Transmission is digital and, depending on the provider, via cable, terrestrial wireless, or IPTV. All GIO stations (public and private) are broadcast on a free-to-air platform managed by Public Broadcasting Services Ltd, the national organisation which runs all state-owned broadcast media.

PBS has a public service obligation, for which it was given a budget of 3,900,000 EUR in 2016, and through which it issues a yearly call for programmes of a diverse nature.

Styx by Wolfgang Fischer, Credit: Mark CassarThe National Book Council held its second annual short film contest with PBS, making available 7,000 EUR in production funds and 1,000 EUR in rights, to adapt a Maltese literary work for the screen. The project for 2016 was Il-Kompliċi, directed by Ryan Gatt from a short-story by Walid Nabhan.

Foreign television channels are readily available via cable, satellite and digital terrestrial transmission. And yet, Broadcasting Authority surveys, held thrice yearly, show that TVM, ONE and Net have retained their position at the top of viewership tables. Channels from Italian state broadcaster RAI, as well as Mediaset stations, fill in the subsequent slots, maintaining a long historical tradition of Maltese viewership. Overall, Maltese channels attracted an average of 66.87% of audience share (an increase of 3.05 points over 2015). Missing from the surveys, for reasons of understandable difficulty in quantification, is the number of viewers that in 2016 had taken to watching foreign programming, US series in particular, on un-licensed streaming services on their computers or through Android TV boxes. Netflix reached Maltese shores in January 2016, but statistics for the first year have not been made publicly available.

  February 2016 July 2016 October 2016
Channel Rank Percentage Rank Percentage Rank Percentage
TVM 1 39.05 1 36.56 1 33.47
ONE 2 14.18 2 18.12 2 18.95
Net 4 10.74 4 8.14 5 9.68
Smash 15 0.33 13 0.42 13 0.29
TVM 2 10 2.04 11 1.29 7 2.62
iTV 14 0.39 14 0.41 12 0.31
f Living 11 1.19 12 1.00 10 0.50
Xejk 16 0.33 15 0.19 - -
Owners’ Best - - - - 14 0.14
Parliament TV 17 0.24 - - - -
Sub [%]   68.49   66.15   65.96
Rai Chs. 6, 12, 13 6.61 6, 10, 17 5.54 6 4.21
Mediaset 5, 7, 9 10.40 5, 7, 9 10.16 3 13.38
BBC - - - - 9 1.71
Discovery Chs. 8 2.46 8 2.63 8 2.37
MTV 18 0.20 16 0.12 11 0.46
Other Station 3 11.84 3 15.41 4 11.91
Sub [%]   31.51   33.85   34.04
Total   100   100   100

Source: Malta Broadcasting Authority

 

From the locally-made programming crop, drama remains the most popular format, consistently hitting the topmost slots. Strada Stretta from Sharp Shoot Media, a period series set in a particular Valletta street known for its hedonistic entertainment in Malta’s days as a British Colony, vied for first rank with Ċaqqufa, a series on female empowerment from Watermelon Media.

    February 2016 July 2016 October 2016
Channel Programme Rank Percentage Rank Percentage Rank Percentage
TVM Strada Stretta 1 14.23 2 9.11 1 14.29
TVM Ċaqqufa 2 13.71 1 9.53 - -
TVM Katrina 3 12.13 3 8.39 - -
TVM Ħbieb u Għedewwa 4 8.78 4 8.28 2 11.84
TVM Tereża - - - - 3 9.77

 

CONTACTS:

MALTA FILM COMMISSION
St Rocco Street
Kalkara KKR 9062
Malta
Phone: +356 2180 9135
www.maltafilmcommission.com
Engelbert Grech, Film Commissioner
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Jean Pierre Borg, PR & Marketing Executive
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Warrior Women. Copyright: Urban CanyonsCREATIVE EUROPE DESK MALTA
21, Chateau de la Ville
Archbishop Street
Valletta VLT1443
Malta
Phone: +356 2567 4210
www.creativeeuropemalta.eu
Lisa Gwen Baldacchino, Head
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ARTS COUNCIL MALTA
Casa Scaglia
16, Mikiel Anton Vassalli Street
Valletta VLT 1311
Phone: + 356 2339 7000
www.artscouncilmalta.org
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Report: Kenneth Scicluna (2017)
Sources: Malta Film Commission, The Times of Malta, The Malta Independent, Malta Today, IMDb, Official Facebook Pages for Simshar, Limestone Cowboy, Filmed in Malta, Stargate Malta, Valletta Film Festival, University of Malta, Arts Council Malta, National Book Council, Malta Broadcasting Authority, Malta Communications Authority, Ministry for Finance.

 


 

Malta Country Profile

By Kenneth Scicluna

VALLETTA: Malta celebrated 90 years of filmmaking in 2015 with several milestones.

Michael Bay’s 13 Hours crowned, in terms of the 50m USD it left behind, a bumper crop of foreign productions that sought to film in Malta, 16 of which benefitted from the Malta Film Commission’s attractive incentive scheme. Other notable names that worked on the island in 2015 include Christian Bale and Oscar Isaac in Terry George’s The Promise, Colin Firth and Rachel Weisz in James Marsh’s The Mercy, and Michael Fassbender in Justin Kurzel’s Assassin’s Creed.

The Ministry for Tourism, responsible for the film commission, launched a draft National Film Policy along with a consultation process that eventually led to a document that was received with mixed feelings.  On the plus side, the MFC also signed agreements with the Malta College for Arts, Science and Technology, as well as the University of Malta, with the aim of creating a strong skill base. In the latter case this led to the launch of a hybrid Master of Arts programme in Film Studies with a practical component. Another initiative by the MFC brought together a crew composed of trainees to create a feature film, 20,000 Reasons, under the tutorship of Film London’s Microwave International programme, which was released locally in 2016.

Rebecca Cremona’s Simshar produced by Kukumajsa Productions Ltd won awards at festivals and gained distribution online in Tunisia and in Australia, and the second feature expected to attract foreign attention, Abigail Mallia’s Limestone Cowboy produced by Take2 Entertainment, entered a long phase of postproduction work. The difficulties of indigenous filmmaking in smaller countries were brought to European attention with a special session at the European Parliament, focussing on Malta and Croatia.

Cinema audiences increased by 8% over the previous year, overwhelmingly opting for US films, with European films getting a lukewarm reception and local productions little more than a sidelong glance overall, even though Simshar was popular with audiences. On the other hand, the Valletta Film Festival got off to a great start with Roland Joffé heading an international jury.

PRODUCTION

Two feature films of note were made in 2015, both with significant involvement from the Malta Film Commission and the Malta Film Fund that it administers. 

Abigail Mallia, a name known locally for above-par television drama, steered her Limestone Cowboy, part-financed with 90,000 EUR from the MFF, into postproduction. Based on a local political dark horse, the film attracted substantial attention throughout its gestation period due to the popularity of the actors featured and the involvement of substantial amounts of extras. Hopes for a 2015 release, teased by the periodic release of production stills, did not materialise however, with the film having its first screening during the 2016 Valletta Film Festival.

Jameson Cucciardi’s 20,000 Reasons, from a script by Malcolm Galea, was the fruit of a long training scheme masterminded by the film commission in conjunction with Film London’s Microwave International programme, and a budget of 200,000 EUR sourced from a European Social Fund scheme. Seeking to bolster skills across the board, the crew benefitted from mentorship throughout the various stages of the process with the film eventually reaching local screens in 2016.

U-Film started work on Dark Waters, a documentary series on wrecks in the Mediterranean, the kind of production uniquely posed to create having a sister company called U-Boat, which specialises in underwater research with the aid of two Triton submersibles.

Returned émigré Mario Philip Azzopardi, known for directing episodes of Star Gate, Dinotopia and Degrassi, produced two television films for Canadian eOne in coproduction with his own Ċittadella Films. Titled A Dangerous Arrangement (starring Tamara Duarte and Colm Meaney) and The Red Dress (with John Rhys-Davies and Once Upon a Time’s Sean Maguire), both films were written by Azzopardi, with the former also having him as director. A large part of the cast on both films was Maltese, with Stargate Malta handling visual effects.

Stargate, a rising VFX star this side of the Mediterranean, with strong support from its parent company in Canada, has helped create another pillar of interest for foreign production companies looking at bringing film work to Malta. Beyond the usual attractions of sunlight on the same latitude as Los Angeles, good weather, a variety of locations, marine facilities, and an affordably talented, multilingual cast and crew, the offer of high-grade value-for-money visual effects has been creating its own particular kind of business, which is no longer dependent on physical locations. In fact, most of the material that Stargate handled in 2015 was shot on location away from Malta. 

On the other hand, their participation in various projects opened a conduit for elements and scenes, sometimes on a fairly large scale, to be filmed in Malta. Some of the company’s larger projects included Pietro Mennea – La Freccia del Sud (Casanova Multimedia, Milk & Honey, Rai Fiction), I Misteri di Laura (Casanova Multimedia, Mediaset), El Principe (Plano a Plano, Mediaset España), Medici: Masters of Florence (Wild Bunch, Big Light, Lux Vide – with Dustin Hoffman), and You, Me and the Apocalypse (Working Title TV, Big Balls Films, Sky, NBC – with Jenna Fischer and Rob Lowe).

Italy has long found Malta a convenient location for its television series and acclaimed leading man Raoul Bova headed back to produce and star in Fuoco Amico: TF45 (RB Productions), which was serviced by veteran company White Coral Films.

The traditional servicing industry enjoyed an equally prosperous year with several high-profile and lucrative productions spending long periods, and large amounts of cash, on the island.

Latina Pictures serviced Michael Bay’s 13 Hours, which saw the construction of a sprawling set making Malta stand for Benghazi, a hectic six-month schedule and the injection of 50m USD into the local economy. Latina also handled Justin Kurzel’s Assassin’s Creed, with Michael Fassbender, which filmed in Valletta on a closely guarded set.

Falkun Films handled Terry George’s film on the Armenian genocide, The Promise, with Charlotte Le Bon, Christian Bale and Oscar Isaac in lead roles, with Valletta this time standing in for Istanbul. The same company also facilitated the production of Stephen Quale’s The Lake with JK Simmons and Diarmaid Murtagh, which made extensive use of the aquatic facilities at the Malta Film Studios.

Russian director Yuriy Moroz brought leading man Maksim Matveyev to Malta to resume his eponymous role in the high-octane series The Gambler. U-Film provided the services, in keeping with the special relationship the company enjoys with the Russian film and television market.

Belgian company Studio 100 returned to Malta to shoot a film, with the assistance of Parker Film & TV, and featuring two characters highly popular with audiences in Flemish Belgium and the Netherlands: Mega Mindy vs Rox.

Small Island Films took care of Philippe de Chauveron’s Débarquement Immédiat!, whilst Twenty13 handled The Mercy, the Donald Donald Crowhurst project directed by James Marsh and featuring Rachel Weisz and Colin Firth.

DISTRIBUTION

Rebecca Cremona’s Simshar went from strength to strength in 2015, a feat remarkable not least because it was the first indigenous film to travel as far, as rapidly, and with as much acclaim as it did.

After finishing 2014 as the most popular Maltese film in local cinemas, and one of the two most popular films overall, Simshar made it again to local screens with a presence spanning the whole year from January to December. The film made it into the official selection of various festivals in Europe, America, Asia and Africa, winning Silver at the California Film Awards, the Silver Dhow at Zanzibar, the Golden Aphrodite at the Cyprus International Film Festival, Best International Feature at Edmonton in Canada, and the Best Director award at Agadir in Morocco.

The true breakthrough came in September 2015 with the general release in Australian cinemas through The Backlot Films, and in Tunisia via Hakka Distribution. Extended several times, the runs lasted until November 2015 down-under and till December 2015 in Tunisia.  Gravitas Ventures acquired the rights for the US and Canada and released it in November 2015 on the major VOD channels, including iTunes, Amazon, Google Play, Time Warner Cable and Comcast.

FILM INSTITUTIONS

In March 2015, the Ministry of Tourism, under whose remit the Malta Film Commission falls, announced the appointment of a consultative council to draft the first national film policy, although the names of those involved were not made public. In September 2015 the draft document was released and a public consultation process launched until October 2015. 

The document assessed the current situation in the film services industry, the local production situation, and the education possibilities available, making fairly generic forward-looking statements in each case. In particular, the report identified anomalous employment conditions in the services industry, particularly with the long hours crew were expected to work, but took a cautious approach in advocating changes. 

The final report was released in January 2016, attracting criticism that, whilst it was a step in the right direction and it cast a glance at the need for a discussion on the preservation of film heritage, it did not go far beyond the generic statements of the draft document.

The Malta Film Fund distributed 243,000 EUR in funds, split as follows:

Section Number of Projects Total Funds Awarded
Writers’ Grant 3 12,400 EUR
Development Grant 1 25,000 EUR
Production Grant: Short Films, New Talent 2 5,000 EUR
Production Grant: Short Films 1 16,000 EUR
Production Grant: Feature Films 3 185,000 EUR

In a drive to bolster film education in Malta, hitherto served by first degrees in media and communication studies at the vocational Malta College of Arts, Sciences and Technology, and at the Faculty of Media and Knowledge Sciences at the University of Malta, the Malta Film Commission signed agreements with both institutions. With MCAST, the commission signed a memorandum of understanding, through which Creative Arts students would be given the opportunity to create several featurettes under the mentorship of the film commission in the various elements required to create the clips.

At the University of Malta, the Ministry of Tourism and the film commission funded the Faculty of Arts to assist it in the setting up of a particular MA in Film Studies programme that aims to provide a solid theoretical and practical base in film.  Tutors in the first year included Antonio Piazza and Fabio Grassadonia (writer and directors of Salvo, 2013 Grand Prix winner at the Semaine de la Critique), Scott Graham (writer and director of 2012 Bafta-nominated Shell) and Gigi Roccati (Babylon Sisters, 2016).

The Valletta Film Festival, launched by the Film Grain Foundation, had its first edition in June 2015 and got off to an auspicious start. More than 5,000 tickets were sold for 77 screenings, with master classes also proving popular.

Also in June 2015, Maltese MEP Marlene Mizzi convened a seminar at the European Parliament in Brussels, to discuss the particular problems faced by the smallest filmmaking countries in Europe.  Using Simshar and Dalibor Matanić’s High Sun / Zvizdan (Croatia, Kinorama, kinorama.hr) as test cases, the seminar had Rebecca Cremona, Martina Petrović (Head of the Croatian Creative Europe Desk, Pauline Durand-Vialle (FERA CEO), Engelbert Grech (Malta Film Commissioner), Matteo Zacchetti (Deputy Head, DG Information Society and Media) and European Commissioner Günther Oettinger, as speakers.

The same topic was discussed through aesthetic, practical and academic lenses in September when the itinerant Small Nations Cinema Conference opened its 2015 sessions in Valletta.  Various filmmakers, scholars and practitioners from ancillary arts met to discuss and deliver papers on the particular voices emerging from the smallest filmmaking nations around the world.

Recognising the efforts made during the previous nine decades, Intellect added an edition on Malta to the seminal World Film Locations series, making it the only book to-date to study the productions made in Malta, of local and foreign origin, in relation to the context in which they were filmed.

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Ticket sales for Maltese films decreased to 2.9% of total sales in 2015 from 4.2% in 2014.  US films still lead the pack with 79% of seats sold (up from 73% in 2014), with EU films registering a meagre but steady 16%.

A total of 375 different titles were shown, up from 368 in 2014. Attendance overall registered an 8% increase, with ticket sales hitting 704,243 and raking in 4.19m EUR in gross receipts, of which Maltese productions pocketed just 0.1 m EUR. Whereas in 2014 Maltese films attracted the largest audience per film (average of 5,500) and had the greatest exposure (average of 280 screening days), the figures almost halved in 2015 (audience 2,500, screening days 70), losing out to films from the US on audience and hitting a draw on the latter figure.

A winner, in rather relative terms, was the documentary format, climbing up from 121 seats sold for two films, to 5,814 admissions for 15 films. On the other hand, stereoscopic films slid downwards to 9.4% of tickets sold from 12.8%.

TV

Malta has nine television channels, two of which are state-owned (TVM, TVM2), two are run by the main political parties (ONE and Net), and the rest are private. Three of the private channels have a General Interest Objectives licence (Smash TV, f Living, Xejk), and the remaining two (iTV, Owners’ Best) are teleshopping channels. The national regulators are the Malta Broadcasting Authority for content and the Malta Communications Authority for matters related to transmission and the service providers.

Transmission is digital and, depending on the provider, via cable, terrestrial wireless, or IPTV. All GIO stations (public and private) are broadcast on a free-to-air platform managed by Public Broadcasting Services Ltd, the national organisation which runs all state-owned broadcast media.

PBS has a public service obligation for which it was given a budget of 3.9m EUR in 2015, and through which it issues a yearly call for programmes of a diverse nature.

The National Book Council launched an annual short film contest with PBS, making available 7,000 EUR in production funds and 1,000 EUR in rights, to adapt a Maltese literary work for the screen. The first project under the scheme was Dar ir-Rummien, directed by Federico Chini from a short story by Pierre J. Mejlak.

Arts Council Malta announced a scheme of its own with a budget of 280,000 EUR. Kultura TV co-finances culturally-relevant works which may be factual or fiction in nature, one-off films or serialised, as long as they are created in coproduction between one of the private television channels and a local production company. Six proposals out of 18 earned sufficient marks and were allocated a total of 184,456 EUR. Creators of televised series also have the option of applying for financing from the Malta Film Fund, although the latter intimates that they are more interested in pushing for material with international marketing potential.

Foreign television channels are readily available via cable, satellite and digital terrestrial transmission. And yet, Broadcasting Authority surveys, held thrice yearly, show that TVM, ONE and Net have retained their position at the top of viewership tables.

Channels from Italian state broadcaster RAI, as well as Mediaset stations, fill in the subsequent slots, maintaining a long historical tradition of Maltese viewership. Overall, Maltese channels attracted an average of 63.82% of audience share. Missing from the surveys, for reasons of understandable difficulty in quantification, is the number of viewers that in 2015 had taken to watching foreign programming, US series in particular, on un-licensed streaming services on their computers or through Android TV boxes. The only indications of a conjecturally substantial size of clandestine viewership came from debates on social media on series that were otherwise not available in Malta, and from the number of adverts for Android receivers. Netflix was still unavailable in 2015, being released to Maltese viewers in January 2016.

  February 2015 July 2015 October 2015
Channel Rank Percentage Rank Percentage Rank Percentage
TVM 1 36.63 1 34.45 1 39.06
ONE 2 17.52 3 15.90 2 14.88
Net 4 8.09 4 8.05 4 8.73
Smash 16 0.23 13 0.70 12 0.52
TVM 2 11 1.03 12 0.82 9 1.49
iTV 15 0.31 15 0.33 18 0.07
f Living 12 0.73 11 0.88 14 0.37
Xejk - - - - 15 0.20
Owners’ Best - - - - 16 0.15
Sub [%]   64.54   61.44   65.47
Rai 1 6 3.91 7 3.27 6 4.76
Rai 2 8 2.32 10 1.47 11 0.88
Rai 3 14 0.33 14 0.54 13 0.37
Rete 4 10 1.18 9 1.73 10 1.10
Canale 5 5 5.35 5 6.99 5 5.66
Italia 1 7 3.81 6 5.00 7 4.08
Discovery Ch. 9 2.22 8 2.96 8 2.91
MTV 13 0.59 17 0.15 17 0.12
Other Station 3 15.76 2 16.45 3 14.64
Sub [%]   35.46   38.56   34.53
Total   100   100   100

 

From the locally-made programming crop, drama remains the most popular format, consistently hitting the topmost slots. Ċaqqufa, a drama on female empowerment from Watermelon Media vied for first rank with Rewind Productions’ tale on two orphans, Katrina. A drama on a particular Valletta street, known for its hedonistic entertainment in Malta’s days as a British Colony, Strada Stretta from Sharp Shoot Media entered the charts at the fifth slot in October, to quickly climb to the top by February 2016.

    February 2015 July 2015 October 2015
Channel Programme Rank Percentage Rank Percentage Rank Percentage
TVM Ċaqqufa 1 16.09 2 14.63 2 13.84
TVM Katrina 2 13.55 1 15.10 1 14.94
TVM Ħbieb u Għedewwa 4 10.11 4 7.78 4 9.61
TVM Strada Stretta - - - - 5 9.49

 

CONTACTS

MALTA FILM COMMISSION
St Rocco Street
Kalkara KKR 9062
Malta
Phone: +356 2180 9135
www.maltafilmcommission.com
Engelbert Grech, Film Commissioner
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Jean Pierre Borg, PR & Marketing Executive
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CREATIVE EUROPE DESK MALTA
21, Chateau de la Ville
Archbishop Street
Valletta VLT1443
Malta
Phone: +356 2567 4210
www.creativeeuropemalta.eu
Lisa Gwen Baldacchino, Head
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Sources: Malta Film Commission, National Statistics Office, The Times of Malta, The Malta Independent, Malta Today, IMDb, Official Facebook Pages for Simshar, Limestone Cowboy, Filmed in Malta, Stargate Malta, Intellect Ltd, Valletta Film Festival, MCAST, University of Malta, Malta Broadcasting Authority
Report by Kenneth Scicluna

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

Polish cinema had a strong and challenging year in 2017, with record-breaking box office results, the celebration of 70 years of Polish animation, international success of feature and documentary films, worldwide distribution for domestic titles, as well as new international coproduction agreements and crucial changes within the Polish Film Institute.

PRODUCTION

Werewolf by Adrian Panek, photo: Balapolis / Łukasz BąkIn 2017 Poland produced over 45 feature films, most of them supported by the Polish Film Institute.

One of the major Polish coproductions shot in 2017 was the new drama by Oscar-winning Polish director Paweł Pawlikowski Cold War / Zimna wojna, recently acquired by Amazon Studios. Pawlikowski told FNE that the film tells the story of two young people and their difficult love in the 50s-60s. Cold War is a British/Polish/French coproduction between Apocalypso Pictures, Opus Film and MK Productions.

Wojciech Smarzowski shot his new crime drama about the Catholic Church reform in Poland under the working title 3 in August 2017. The film is produced by Profil Film Jacek Rzehak.

Adrian Panek shot his sophomore film Werewolf in July-November 2017. This Polish/Dutch/German coproduction follows eight children freed from the Gross-Rosen concentration camp in 1945. The film is a coproduction between Balapolis (Balapolis), House of Netherhorror and Twenty Twenty Vision Filmproduktion.

In autumn 2017 Jan Jakub Kolski started working on his new drama, the Polish/Czech coproduction Pardon, and resumed work on 15 January 2018. The story is set in 1946 and follows a married couple travelling through Poland with a casket containing the body of their 26-year-old son. The film is produced by Centrala and the director's company Wytwórnia Doświadczalna in coproduction with the Czech company Mimesis Film.

Also in 2017 the master of the Polish action cinema Władysław Pasikowski took on directing the third part of the Pitbull crime trilogy after Patryk Vega decided not to helm the last installment of his hit project. Shooting for Pitbull. The Last Dog took place in Warsaw in October 2017. The film is produced by Ent One Investments.

Pitbull. The Last Dog by Władysław Pasikowski, photo Maciej Hachlica, copyright Ent One InvestmentsOscar nominated Bartosz Konopka wrapped The Mute, a Polish/Belgian coproduction set in the Middle Ages, when two men come to a pagan land - one to bring Christianity, the other to find his way of living. The film is produced by Otter Films in coproduction with Odra Film and Earlybirds Films. New Europe Film Sales is handling the sales and Kino Świat will release the film domestically.

Also in 2017 the acclaimed director Krzysztof Zanussi shot his new feature film Ether, that follows a military doctor at the beginning of the 20th century as he is experimenting with science in order to get power over people. TOR Film Production is producing. The film was shot in Poland, the Ukraine and Hungary in August-December 2017.

In 2017 acclaimed writer/director Andrzej Jakimowski finished his new film Once in November / Pewnego razu w listopadzie, a drama inspired by the political climate in Poland. The film was produced by Zjednoczenie Artystów i Rzemieślników and was domestically released by Kino Świat on 3 November 2017 with 11,176 admissions to date.

Poland celebrated 70 years of animation with special spothlights at the Toulouse Cartoon Forum and MIPCON 2017 in Cannes, showcasing the newest animated projects, resulting in several promising international projects, like Polish Animoon Studio’s and Chinese Animex Animation’s coproduction of the second season of the Polish animated hit series Hug Me. This is the first animated coproduction between the two countries.

Hug Me seriesDISTRIBUTION

The leading distributors of mainstream cinema on the Polish market are Kino Świat, SPI International Polska and Monolith Films.

The art house market is dominated by Gutek Film and Against Gravity.

The new SVOD platform Showmax was launched in Poland on 15 February 2017 with 172,000 subscribers, which is double than what Netflix had on the Polish market on the same day. Showmax offers international film and TV series as well as investment in local content including new episodes of the Polish hit show Ear of the President / Ucho Prezesa, created by Robert Górski and Kabaret Moralnego Niepokoju. The series became an instant hit with over 27 m viewers when its four episodes were first aired on Youtube. Showmax had also teamed up with Polish box office hit directors Patryk Vega and Wojciech Smarzowski, who directed short thrillers that were the focus point of the launch campaign.

Netflix commissioned the first locally produced series in Poland, directed by Agnieszka Holland and Kasia Adamik. The show will be produced by The Kennedy/Marshall Company and Polish The House Media Company. The title of the series has not been revealed yet. The international premiere is planned for 2018.

In 2017 Netlix also teamed up with Poland’s Platige Image and is currently in development with a new English-language series based on The Witcher saga by Andrzej Sapkowski. Platige Image, which sold the adaption rights to Netflix, will coproduce with Polish filmmaker Tomasz Bagiński directing at least one episode in each season of the show. Platige Image signed a contract with Netflix covering the production of the first and potential upcoming seasons.

Spoor by Agnieszka HollandPopular Polish VOD portals include Ipla, Player (previously TVN Player) and Vod TVP, providing programmes from public broadcasters.

In 2017 TVP launched an international streaming service for TVP Polonia, its international channel for Polish-speaking audiences from abroad. Streaming is available at polonia.tvp.pl. TVP also plans to introduce a VOD service for mobile devices and a stream for Smart TV users.

The leading Polish VOD service from Onet.pl launched O!Dokument, a new platform offering high quality Polish documentaries awarded at international film festivals. The project launched in February 2017 and is supported by the Polish Film Institute.

It was a strong year for Polish features, with Spoor / Pokot by Agnieszka Holland having its international premiere in the competition of the 67th Berlinale IFF, where it was awarded the Silver Bear Alfred Bauer Prize. The film went into regular distribution in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Sweden, Finland and Norway, and was chosen as Poland’s 2017 Academy Awards bid. Beta Cinema sold it to several territories including China, Turkey, Cyprus, former Yugoslavia, Spain and Andorra.

Piotr Domalewski’s debut feature Silent Night won the top Golden Lion Prize at the 42nd Gdynia Film Festival (18-23 September 2017) with broad critical acclaim. The film was produced by Munk Studio – Polish Filmmakers Association with a budget of 700,000 EUR. The project was supported by the Polish Film Institute with 233,547 EUR / 1 m PLN and also by the Warmia and Mazury Film Fund.

Silent Night by Piotr DomalewskiLoving Vincent, a fully painted animation feature about Van Gogh, directed by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman, became one of the most internationally recognised and broadly distributed Polish productions in 2017. The film won the European Film Award for the Best European Animated Feature Film 2017 and was sold to over 130 territories including France, China, Italy, Spain, Denmark, Finland, Norway, Sweden, Greece, Portugal, Japan, Thailand, Colombia, India, Russia and Brazil.

It was also another great year for Polish documentaries, with EFA winning Communion by Anna Zamecka becoming one of the most recognised titles of the year. The documentary produced by Otter Films, Wajda Studio and HBO Europe, with the support of the Polish Film Institute, won over 20 international awards including the Critics’ Week Award at Locarno 2016, best documentary at Warsaw Film Festival 2016 , Young Eyes Award at DOK Leipzig 2016 and Silver Eye Award at Jihlava IDFF 2016.

Andrzej Wajda's latest production Afterimage continued to generate major interest abroad. In 2017 the film was theatrically released in Canada, France, Czech Republic, Greece, Hungary, Bulgaria, USA and Japan.

Polish box office hits made a big splash on the UK market in 2017. Michalina Wisłocka’s biopic Art of Loving was released in the UK and Ireland by Odeon on 31 March 2017 and made 84,583 EUR on the British market. In October 2017 the Polish box office success Botox, directed by Patryk Vega and distributed by Phoenix Productions, opened at number five in the UK, cashing in 1,133,353 EUR. Polish box office nr 1, TVN's romantic comedy Letters to Santa 3 by Tomasz Konecki, hit the top 10 at the UK box office with 450,655 EUR gross in its first weekend. The film was released by Phoenix Productions in 253 British cinemas on 24 November 2017.

Successful Polish films and coproductions from 2016 continued their journey abroad. Agnus Dei (Aeroplan), Anne Fontaine’s French/Polish/Belgian coproduction, was released by Thimfilm GMBH in Austria on 16 June 2017. The film became one of the most popular Polish productions abroad with distribution in Canada, Spain, Japan, Brasil, Mexico, Italy, Denmark, Sweden, Estonia, Finland, Norway, Portugal, Greece, Switzerland, Columbia, UK, USA an Australia. Film Distribution is handling the sales.

Loving Vincent by Dorota Kobiela and Hugh Welchman11 Minutes by Jerzy Skolimowski was released by Zootrope Films in Portuguese cinemas on 19 April 2017. The film was also in regular distribution in the UK, Portugal and Japan, and is also available on iTunes and Netflix.

Ira Carpelan’s and Jakub Wronski’s animated film Moomins and the Winter Wonderland opened on 500 Scandinavian screens on 1 December 2017 and also in France, Japan and Poland on 22 December 2017. The film based on the iconic series created by Tove Jansson is a Polish/Finnish coproduction between Animoon and Filmkompanie. The film is available worldwide in 23 language versions.

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Poland has over a thousand cinemas, 80% operated by big multiplex cinema chains. The leading companies are Cinema City with over 30 multiplex cinemas, 380 screens and 110,000 seats, Helios with 42 cinemas and 49,000 seats, and Multikino with 33 cinemas and 60,000 seats.

Additionally, there are more than 600 one-screen cinemas.

In 2017 Polish cinema saw another record breaking year with an all-time best result of 56 m total admissions and two domestic titles topping the overall box office. Total gross was 254.6 m EUR.

Communion by Anna ZameckaAdmissions increased by almost 10% compared to 2016, when admissions were 51 m. The romantic comedy Letters to Santa 3, directed by Tomasz Konecki and produced by TVN, topped the 2017 box office with record-breaking 2.98 m admissions. The TVN series has been on top of the Polish box office for years. Letters to Santa directed by Mitja Okorn had 2.5 m admissions in 2011 and Letters to Santa 2 directed by Maciej Dejczar had 2.5 m admissions in 2015.

TVN's hit is followed by Botox, directed by Patryk Vega and produced by Ent One, with 2.31 m admissions in 2017. This dark medical thriller had 711,906 admissions during the opening weekend, becoming the best domestic premiere in 2017 and the second best domestic premiere in the last 30 years. It also reached the number four spot in Ireland on its opening weekend, with 100,000 EUR and the number five spot in the UK overall box office with nearly 890,000 EUR (which includes the Irish results).

The overall Polish 2017 box office also includes: Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Despicable Me 3, The Art of Loving directed by Maria Sadowska (Watchout Productions, 1.8 m admissions), Sing, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, Fifty Shades Darker, Smurfs: The Lost Village and The Fate of the Furious.

The average price of a cinema ticket is 4.2 EUR / 18.6 PLN.

In 2017 the Polish Film Institute received 18.3 m EUR / 78 m PLN from the European Union for the digitalisation and reconstruction of Polish cinema. Polish films are set to be totally digitalised by 2020.

Moomins And The Winter Wonderland by Ira Carpelan and Jakub WronskiGRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

Up to 45-50 films are produced annually with an average budget of approximately 930,000–1.1 m EUR / 4- 4.5 m PLN.

The Polish Film Institute is the largest source of funding with additional funds coming from the television, a well-developed network of regional film funds, as well as private sources. The most frequent coproduction partners for Poland are Germany, France and the Czech Republic, with growing involvement of the Scandinavian countries including Sweden and Denmark.

Polish Minister of Culture and National Heritage Piotr Gliński dismissed Magdalena Sroka as the Director of the Polish Film Institute on 9 October 2017 and Radosław Śmigulski was appointed Director of the Polish Film Institute for five years in December 2017.

In 2017 PISF granted approximately 32.2 m EUR / 135 m PLN through the Film Production Operational Programme for script development, project development and production of feature films, documentaries and animated films. Projects implementing the international promotion of Polish cinema received a total of 2.3 m EUR / 9.6 m PLN in funding. In 2017 the Institute set a new operational priority for productions with micro budgets. The 2018 PISF budget is 48.9 m EUR / 204,132,000 PLN with new genre cinema priority to be introduced this year.

Poland still awaits a tax incentives law. Poland has special production agreements with several countries and in 2017 struck new cooperation deals with Lithuania and Vietnam.

The Art of Loving by Maria SadowskaIn 2017 the Polish Ministry of Culture and National Heritage held a special competition for feature film projects about Polish history. The winning screenwriters received 132,922 EUR / 565,000 PLN as script development and awards.

Poland has a well-developed network of regional film funds with 12 active funds with Warmia and Mazury Regional Film Fund launched in 2017. Other film funds offering production support as coproducers or funders are: Łódź FF, Gdynia FF, Silesia FF, Lower Silesia FF, Poznań FF, Porkaprackie FF, Krakow FF, Białystok FF, West Pomerania FF, Lublin FF and Mazovia FF.

The Polish Filmmakers Association (SFP) has over 1,700 members. The SFP is involved in the organisation of film events including festivals and major markets. Munk Studio – Polish Filmmakers Association, which operates within the structure of the SFP, produces short films and debut features made by young filmmakers. Polish producers are members of the Polish Audiovisual Producers Chamber of Commerce (KIPA) established in November 2000 in order to protect “the economic and legal interests of the Polish audiovisual sector.” In 2017 the SFP introduced a new grant for cinema distributors.

In 2017 Munk Studio and CANAL+ announced their plans to launch a new 60 Minutes programme to support debut filmmakers with a budget of 237,000 EUR / 1 m PLN for each 60-minute film. The films will be produced both for cinema and TV distribution.

The Polish market has also a very active network of film commissions located in the Lower Silesia, Małopolska, Mazovia, Silesia and Wielkopolska regions and the cities of Łódź and Poznań.

Film Commission Poland was created in order to centralise all these activities as the first source of information on organising production in Poland. Film Commission Poland offers an interactive portal with an online catalogue of locations and Polish film professionals available at http://filmcommissionpoland.pl.

On 1 June 2017 the Polish Minister of Culture and National Heritage Piotr Gliński merged the two leading film institutions, the Polish National Film Archive and the National Audiovisual Institute, into one unit named the National Film Archive - Audiovisual Institute.

Letters To Santa 3 by Tomasz Konecki, photo: Kino ŚwiatTV

Public and private broadcasters are an integral part of the Polish film industry as producers and commissioners of locally produced content.

The leading TV channels in Poland are public TVP holdings with flagship channel TVP1 with 11.3% market share in the second quarter of 2017 (according to the National Broadcasting Chamber), followed by Polsat with 10.31% market share and TVN with 10% market share.

TVP continues to be the biggest source of funds for filmmakers. In 2017 TVP and CDRTV China’s TV Chengdu Radio & Television went into coproduction of an eight-episode documentary series about Polish and Chinese economic relations.

In 2017 TVP undertook a major project The Crown of Kings, a costume TV series directed by Wojciech Pacyna about the life of Casimir III the Great. The show is a local attempt to tap into the costume drama soap opera genre, which became very popular in Poland thanks to the Turkish production The Magnificent Century: Kösem, a big hit for TVP in 2016. The Crown of Kings premiered on 1 January 2018 with a strong average of 3 m viewers per episode.

Maciej Stuhr in Teacher / BelferThis year TVP also launched an EU co-financed project that will digitalise its 800 archive productions in the course of the next three years. The budget of the project is almost 19 m EUR / 81 m PLN. The digitalisation is planned for 36 months with 836 unique titles restored from analogue archives to 4K sound and image format. Feature films, documentaries, TV series and TV theatre plays will be restored by a team of 79 Polish specialists.

TVN is still strongly engaged in film production (for example, box office hit Letters to Santa 3) and invests in producing domestic content for TV. As its new original series Belle Epoque hit a record of 2.9 m viewers during the premiere of the first episode, TVN decided to invest in the format, to produce a second season and to sell it abroad.

One of the key players in Polish film production is HBO Polska, a channel focused on supporting original cinema and programming. The second season of locally produced Polish drama The Pack / Wataha, directed by Kasia Adamik and Jan P. Matuszyński, had a day-and-date premiere across HBO Europe on 15 October 2017.

In 2017 CANAL+ produced the second season of its hit original series Teacher / Belfer, with TVN as executive producer. Belfer was the first production after the station's return to production of local programming. The series aired between 2 October and 27 November 2016, with the first episode gathering an average of 267,000 viewers and the final episode 460,000 viewers.

In 2017 CANAL+ also commissioned two new original crime series directed by Maciej Pieprzyca and Leszek Dawid. Opus Film and Telemark are producing.

Polish private broadcaster Polsat introduced a new TV format in cooperation with Ikea Retail, which commissioned and sponsored the first Polish product placement mini-series, House Full of Changes / Dom pełen zmian directed by Kristoffer Russ.

CONTACTS:

POLISH FILM INSTITUTE
Krakowskie Przedmieście 21/23
00-071 Warsaw, Poland
Phone: +48 22 42 10 130
The Pack / Wataha by Kasia Adamik and Jan P. MatuszyńskiFax: (22) 42 10 241
www.pisf.pl
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POLISH FILMMAKERS ASSOCIATION
Krakowskie Przedmieście 7
00-068 Warsaw, Poland
Phone.: (48) 22 556 54 40 / 50, (48) 22 845 51 32
Fax: (48) 22 845 39 08
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www.sfp.org.pl

FILM COMMISSION POLAND
Chełmska 21 bud 4/56
00-724 Warsaw, Poland
Phone: (+48) 693 477 607
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www.filmcommissionpoland.pl

FILM COMMISSIONS

WROCŁAW FILM COMMISSION
50-020 Wrocław, Piłsudskiego 64A, Poland
Phone: +48 71 793 79 72, +48 601 384 194
Fax: +48 71 79 400 88
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www.odra-film.wroc.pl

ŁÓDŹ FILM COMMISSION
90-926 Łódź, Piotrkowska 102, Poland
Phone: +48 42 638 55 46
Fax: (+48) 42 638 40 89
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www.lodzfilmcommission.pl

KRAKOW FILM COMMISSION
31-513 Kraków, Olszańska 7, Poland
Phone: +48 12 424 96 61, +48 501 051 605
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www.film-commission.pl

MAZOVIA WARSAW FILM COMMISSION
00-139 Warsaw, Elektoralna 12, Poland
Phone: +48 22 586 42 58
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www.mwfc.pl

House Full of Changes by Kristoffer Rus - ikea miniseriesPOZNAN FILM COMMISSION
61-767 Poznan, Masztalarska 8, Poland
Phone: +48 61 8528833 ext. 35
Fax: +48 61 8528835
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www.poznanfilmcommission.pl

SILESIA FILM COMMISSION
40-008 Katowice, Górnicza 5, Poland
Phone: +48 698 353 147
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Report by Katarzyna Grynienko (2018)
Sources: the Polish Film Institute, the National Broadcasting Chamber

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

Ana, mon amour by Călin Peter NetzerIn May 2017 the Chamber of Deputies rejected the Film Law which was approved by the Romanian government as an emergency ordinance on 29 November 2016 and was aiming at bringing the Romanian film law in line with European legislation. 

The Romanian Film Centre (CNC) launched only one grant contest in 2017, although the law requires two sessions per year.

The country saw a dramatic decrease in domestic admissions (from 484,739 in 2016 to an estimated 250,000 in 2017), but the number of domestic debut features increased.

Total admissions increased by 11.25 percent and total box office increased by 14 percent from 2016, according to the estimations provided by the CNC.

The most important accolades for the Romanian cinema in 2017 were the Silver Bear for Outstanding Artistic Contribution for editing received by Călin Peter Netzer’s Ana, mon amour, and Best Actor award given to Bogdan Dumitrache for Pororoca by Constantin Popescu at the 2017 San Sebastian Film Festival.

Pororoca by Constantin Popescu, credit: Scharf Film & AdvertisingPRODUCTION

Most of the films produced in 2017 were supported by the Romanian Film Centre. Important filmmakers were in production with new projects in 2017. Radu Jude shot his new feature filmIs This What You Were Born For? with his regular producer Ada Solomon from Hi Film Productions in summer-fall 2017. The film is a Romanian/Czech/French/Bulgarian coproduction between by Hi Film Productions, endorfilm, Les Films d’Ici and Klas Film. Beta Cinema is handling the sales and Micro Film will release it in Romania in 2018.

Radu Muntean shot his new feature film Alice T. in August 2017. This psychological drama is a Romanian/Swedish/French coproduction between Multi Media Est, Chimney and  Les Films de L'Apres Midi.

Stere Gulea shot a sequel to Moromeții, 30 years after his first adaptation of the novel by Marin Preda in one of the most acclaimed Romanian movies of all times. Moromeții 2 is produced by Tudor Giurgiu through Libra Film Productions and will be domestically released by Transilvania Film on 9 November 2018.

In 2017 Tudor Giurgiu shot his fourth film as a director and his first film as a director abroad. Based on a Romanian bestseller, Above Man, the Woman Soars / Apropierea / Sin Aliento is a Romanian/Spanish/Czech coproduction between Libra Film, Clint Movies and Evolution Films.

Lemonade by Ioana UricaruIn 2017 Anca Damian started the production of the long animated filmThe Extraordinary Voyage of Marona / Extraordinara calatorie a Maronei, a coproduction between Romania’s  Aparte Film, France’s Sacrebleu and Belgium’s Mind Meets.

In spring 2017 Paul Negoescu shot his first international coproduction, Never Let It Go, produced by him through Papillon Film & N-Graphix in coproduction with Poli Angelova through Bulgaria's Screening Emotions. Negoescu’s previous film Two Lottery Tickets / Două lozuri, an independent comedy produced by Actoriedefilm.ro on a budget of approximately 30,000 EUR, became the domestic film with the best box office (540,000 EUR / 2,403,355 RON) in 2016.

Several expected debut features were shot in 2017. Ioana Uricaru’s Lemonade was shot in Montreal and Bucharest in June-August 2017. The film is a Romanian/Canadian/German/Swedish coproduction produced by Cristian Mungiu through Romania’s Mobra films in coproduction with Canada’s Peripheria, Germany’s 42 Film and Sweden’s Filmgate Films. It is the first Romanian film made with Canadian support since 1989.

Writers/directors Gabi Virginia Șarga and Cătălin Rotaru, who were selected with their very first short film 4:15 p.m. The End of the World for Cannes short film competition in 2016, filmed their debut feature in autumn of 2017. Thou Shalt Not Kill / Să nu ucizi aka Primum Non Nocere is a 100% Romanian production produced by Adina Sădeanu through Axis Media Production in coproduction with Gabi Virginia Șarga and Cătălin Rotaru through Green Cat Film.

Hadrian Marcu shot his debut feature Shadow and Dream (working title) in 2017. The film is a Romanian/Polish coproduction produced by Anamaria Antoci and Adrian Silișteanu through Romania's 4 Proof Film in coproduction with Klaudia Smieja and Beata Rzezniczek through Poland's Madants. The film was shot in the spring of 2017.

Shadow and Dream by Hadrian Marcu shooting, credit: Andrei DascalescuRomania continued to host international coproductions despite the fact that a tax incentive scheme is long awaited. In 2017 Cristian Mungiu got involved in a big international project with his company Mobra Films. Palm d'or winner Jacques Audiard shot The Sisters Brothers, starring Joaquin Phoenix, John C. Reilly and Jake Gyllenhaal, in Romania in August-September 2017. This western set in Oregon in 1851 is a French/American/Romanian coproduction between Why Not Productions, Annapurna Pictures and Mobra Films.

The Nun, directed by Corin Hardy, was the first New Line Cinema/Warner Bros. production to be shot at Castel Film Studios in 2017. The spin-off to the 2016 The Conjuring 2 was shot entirely in Romania from May to June 2017 as a medium budget production by New Line Cinema, Atomic Monster and The Safran Company.

Castel Film Studios also serviced for the Hallmark film Family Royal directed by and starring James Brolin in 2017.

The romantic drama See You Soon starring Liam McIntyre, Jenia Tanaeva and Harvey Keitel was shot in Romania in July 2017. Romania's Alien Film serviced it not only in Romania, but also in Greece and Russia.

Ana, mon amour by Călin Peter NetzerDISTRIBUTION

The day-and-date release is in its early stages in Romania. Romanian distributors usually release their international films on VOD four to six months after their theatrical release. Antoine Bagnaninchi, who runs Independenta Film  and distributes art house titles, says that VOD has become routine for most of his films.

Independenta Film joined the VOD platform Seenow in mid-April 2015. Seenow is operated by Direct One and is the first Romanian provider of live TV and VOD available on all screens.

However, Matei Truța, Distribution Manager with the Romanian company Transilvania Film (distributing art house films) told FNE in its Distributor of the Month section in April 2017, that “the specifics of the Romanian market are such that both VOD and Home Video are rather underdeveloped” .

In May 2016, Matei Truța also told FNE: “Presently VOD constitutes less than 5% of our annual revenues. This in the context of the Romanian VOD market, in general, being underdeveloped and struggling with piracy.”

Questioned as to where he saw VOD in Romania five years from now, Truța answered: “VOD will definitely have a strong voice in how the future of the Romanian film market is shaped, but I don’t know if the next five years will be enough to see it done. Ultimately, it will come down to correctly addressing a series of problems before the VOD market can grow: piracy and adapting the distributors' offer to the consumers' need.”

Pororoca by Constantin Popescu, credit: Scharf Film & AdvertisingCINEPUB, an online and free of charge platform for Romanian films, was launched on YouTube by GAV on 26 February 2015. Cinepub in partnership with Google Romania shows domestic feature films, short films and documentaries. Mubi was also launched in Romania in 2015 and has several Romanian films in its portfolio. Netflix was launched in Romania in 2016.

A new Romanian film distributor Bad Unicorn made its debut on the Romanian market by releasing Ildikó Enyedi's On Body and Soul on 30 June 2017. The film had 15,781 admissions until the end of 2017.

In 2017 more domestic films were released in Romania by major distributors such as Vertical Entertainment and Ro Image 2000.

Festival exposure continued to help Romanian films to be sold abroad. Călin Peter Netzer’s psychological drama Ana, mon amour was sold by Beta Cinema to 12 territories. This Romanian/German/French coproduction between Parada Film, augenschein Filmproduktion and Sophie Dulac Productions was sold to: Benelux, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Greece, Turkey, ex-Yugoslavia, China, Taiwan, Germany, France and Mexico. The film was released in Romania by Vertical Entertainment on 3 March 2017 and had 25,146 admissions until the end of the year.

Wide Management sold the psychological drama Pororoca by Constantin Popescu to China, Croatia, Slovenia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia, Montenegro, Macedonia, Kosovo, Albania, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay, Uruguay, Spain and France, following its premiere in the main competition of the San Sebastian FF. The film was produced by Romania’s Scharf Film & Advertising in coproduction with France’s Irreverence Films.

Soldiers. A Story from Ferentari, the debut feature of Serbian director Ivana Mladenovic, was acquired by the German sales agent Beta Cinema before its world premiere at the San Sebastian FF. The film was also selected for Toronto Festival’s Discovery section and is set for release in Romania by Micro Film on 2 February 2018. The film is a coproduction between Romania’s HiFilm Productions, Serbia’s Film House Bas Celik and Belgium’s FRAKAS Productions.

Fixer by Adrian SitaruAndrei Crețulescu's debut feature Charleston aka Charlton Heston was picked up by Paris-based sales agent Versatile. This Romanian/French coproduction between Icon Production and Les films du tambour and in association with Romania’s Kinosseur, was selected for the International Competition of Locarno 2017 and is set for domestic release in 2018.

Adrian Sitaru’s Fixer / Fixeur, which was chosen as Romania’s official candidate for the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences nomination in the Best Foreign Language Film category in 2018, has been sold by MPM Film to Italy, Norway and Denmark. The film was produced by Romania’s 4Proof Film in coproduction with France’s Petit Film, and was already released in Romania and France in 2017.

 

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Since 2008, RomâniaFilm, the former cinema network inherited from the communist era, has re-assigned more than 100 cinemas to local councils, but less than 10% are still screening films. Romania is currently the country with the fewest cinema theaters per population in Europe. Seventy eight percent of Romanian towns don’t have any cinemas in use.

The first state cinema opened in Romania after 1990, Cinema Ateneu, was opened in Iași in October 2017. Local authorities invested approximately 100,000 EUR in its renovation and 3D equipment.

Octav by Serge Ioan CelebidachiThe plan to build an art house cinema network in Romania was the core of a meeting of local exhibitors, distributors and filmmakers, and also representatives of Europa Cinemas and the European Commission. The meeting was held during the 20th Europa Cinemas Network Conference in Bucharest (24-26 November 2017). The idea of a network including local art house cinemas was part of the Film Law elaborated by the Romanian Ministry of Culture under the minister Corina Șuteu and rejected by the Parliament in May 2017. Nico Simon, the President of Europa Cinemas, and Lucia Recalde, head of the MEDIA unit, said that their institutions might start helping the network when it is in place.

Cinema Elvire Popesco from Bucharest was among the winners of the Europa Cinemas Awards 2017 announced at the 20th Europa Cinemas Network Conference in Bucharest on 24 November 2017. Boglarka Nagy, the programmer of Cinema Elvire Popesco, Bucharest, Romania received  the Best Programming Award.

Cinema City opened its 25th multiplex in Romania in Galați at the end of November 2017. The biggest cinema operator in the country, which celebrated its 10th year in Romania in 2017, opened its fourth Romanian 4DX cinema in Brăila Mall in August 2017. New multiplexes helped increase admissions, which were as low as almost 3 m in 2007, to more than 13 m in 2016. Now Cinema City dominates more than half of the market with 25 multiplexes in 18 towns, totalling 231 screens and over 41,400 seats.

The first 12 D cinema in Romania opened in the Museum of National Science in Galați on 19 July 2017. The nine-seat hall was equipped with the support of a private investor.

Ninety two cinemas were operating in Romania in 2016. Of the 393 screens, 371 were digitalised, according to the Romanian Film Centre. No statistics or estimations for 2017 were available until the wrap of this report.

A total of 19 domestic films (including one minority coproduction) were released in 2017 and had 250,000 admissions (according to the CNC’s estimations), while 20 domestic films sold 484,739 tickets in 2016.

6.9 on the Richter Scale by Nae CaranfilThe 2017 crop of films has not produced a popular youth film such as #Selfie 69 by Cristina Iacob (with 150,384 admissions in 2016), a comedy like Two Lottery Tickets by Paul Negoescu (133,788 admissions in 2016) or a festival darling such as Cristian Mungiu’s Graduation (55,533 admissions in 2016).

The most successful domestic films in 2017 were the nostalgic melodrama Octav, the debut feature by Serge Ioan Celebidachi with 57,068 admissions and 185,138 EUR / 858,237 RON gross (distributor Oblique Media), Ghinionistul by Iura Luncasu  with 50,727 admissions and 208,077 EUR / 964,570 RON gross (distributor Vertical Entertainment), 6.9 on the Richter Scale / 6,9 pe scara Richter by Nae Caranfil with 32,996 admissions and 100,157 EUR / 464,296 RON gross (distributor Voodoo Films), A Step Behind the Seraphim / Un pas in urma serafimilor, the debut feature by Daniel Sandu, with 31,550 admissions and 81,587 EUR / 378,209 RON gross (distributor Micro Film) and Hawaii aka Uruguay by Jesus Del Cerro with 25,946 admissions and 108,549 EUR / 503,198 RON gross (distributor Ro Image 2000).

The 19 films released in 2017 include six debut features and three long documentaries, while another four debut features are ready to be released in 2018. Only three debut features and two documentaries were theatrically released in 2016.

The admissions chart 2017 is topped by Fast & Furious with 683,826 admissions and 13,315,379 RON gross. The film is followed in the box office by Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, Thor: Ragnarok, Fifty Shades Darker and Star Wars: The Last Jedi. An admissions chart cannot be drawn up because distributor Forum Film Romania stopped reporting admissions to Cinemagia, which is the only private initiative in film statistics in Romania. As a result, total admissions cannot be estimated until the Romanian Film Centre releases its 2017 statistics in the spring of 2018.

Total admissions increased by 11.25 percent from 13,033,687 in 2016 to an estimated 14,500,000 in 2017, according to the Romanian Film Centre (CNC). Box office increased by 14 percent from 53,684,981EUR / 241,582,416 RON in 2016 to an estimated 61,222,222 EUR / 275,500,000 RON. CNC also estimates that admissions for domestic films were 250,000 in 2017.

One Step Behind the Seraphim by Daniel SanduGRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

There was one grant session launched by the Romanian Film Center (CNC) in 2017. In November 2017 the CNC announced it would give 10,750,000 EUR / 50 m RON for feature film production (5,267,500 EUR / 24.5 m RON), debut feature production (1,612,500 EUR / 7.5 m RON), documentary production (1,075,000 EUR / 5 m RON), animated film production (1,075,000 EUR / 5 m RON), short fiction film production (537,500 EUR / 2.5 m RON) and development (107,500 EUR / 0.5 m RON). The results will be announced in 2018.

In the same session, CNC launched for the first time production grants for short and long thematical films. The theme of this session was the celebration of 100 years since the Great Union of 1918, which led to the modern state. The amount for this section was 1,075,000 EUR / 5 m RON.

According to the law, there should be two grants sessions per year, but in 2017 things went slowly due to a new Minister of Culture, Lucian Romaşcanu, who was expected to issue a paper regarding the grant contest regulations, with the Parliament's approval of the Emergency Ordinance regarding the thematical film grants.

In January 2017 the Ministry of Culture changed its name to the Ministry of Culture and National Identity, as one of its main goals in 2017 was to prepare the centennial of the union of 1918.

Lemonade by Ioana UricaruIn May 2017 the Chamber of Deputies rejected the Film Law approved by the Romanian government as an emergency ordinance on 29 November 2016. The new law proposed by the Ministry of Culture, was aimed at bringing the Romanian film law in line with the European legislation and was approved by the Government in December 2016, shortly before the parliamentary elections won by the Social-Democratic Party.

Lucian Romaşcanu was named the new Minister of Culture, announced by the Romanian Prime Minister Mihai Tudose on 28 June 2017, following Ionuţ Vulpescu, who had been re-appointed Minister of Culture in January 2017, after the Social Democratic Party (PSD) won the parliamentary elections in November 2016.

Romania doesn’t have a tax incentives scheme yet. The former Minister of Culture Corina Șuteu announced her intention to launch such a scheme in Cannes in 2016, but Șuteu’s intentions aiming at a multi-levelled reform in the film industry were blocked when the PSD won the elections in November 2016 and rejected the new Film Law in spring 2017. A petition pointing out to the need of having a tax incentives scheme in Romania has been signed by more than 3,500 professionals since 28 November 2017.

TV

The Government eliminated the radio-TV tax starting 1 January 2017 and started to allot similar funding to the Romanian public broadcaster and the public service.

In September 2017 Doina Gradea was confirmed by the Romanian Parliament as acting general manager of the Romanian public broadcaster (SRTV) after the rejection of the activity report on 2016 and thus the dissolution of the Council of Administration led by the former general manager Irina Radu.

Shadows series, photo: Adi Marineci for HBOIrina Radu, who had been acting general manager since September 2015, said that 2016 was a though year, when the institution was confronted with approximately 150 m EUR in debt. Romanian public television runs several channels: TVR 1, TVR 2, TVR 3, TVR HD, TVR News, TVR i, TVR Moldova and five territorial studios.

The most popular private channels in Romania are: Pro TV (member of Media Pro trust, which is run by CME, Central European Media Enterprises), Antena 1 and Antena 3 (both members of Antena Group), B1 TV (owned by businessman, film producer and director Bobby Păunescu), Realitatea TV and Kanal D (run by the Turkish trust Dogan).

Cinemaraton, the first channel to broadcast only domestic films in Romania, started airing on 30 March 2017. The channel is distributed free of charge to the subscribers of AKTA. AKTA is the brand under which the telecom company Digital Cable Systems SA provides TV channels, internet and telephony to more than 3,000 localities in 35 counties.

In 2017 Pro TV continued to produce and broadcast its popular sitcom Las Fierbinți. Launched in 2012, the series created by Mimi Brănescu and directed by Dragoș Buliga and Constantin Popescu, reached seasons 11 and 12. Both seasons were broadcast in 2017.

Also in 2017 Antena 1 started the production of the series The Forbidden Fruit / Fructul oprit, produced and directed by Ruxandra Ion. Shooting started in November 2017 and it is set to take place in Romania and also in Turkey, since the series is based on a Turkish novel.

The second season of the most popular series produced by HBO Europe in Romania, Shadows / Umbre written and directed by Bogdan Mirică, opened simultaneously on 12 November 2017 in all 19 European countries where HBO operates: Romania, Poland, Bulgaria, Hungary, Croatia, the Czech Republic, Montenegro, Macedonia, Serbia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Moldova, Kosovo, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Spain. Of the six episodes two are directed by Igor Cobileanski.

CASTiNG series, photo: Bogdan NituHBO Romania reconsidered its dubbing policy after more than 5,000 subscribers signed a petition asking the channel to stop dubbing films in August 2017. The reaction came after HBO Romania broadcast a dubbed version of Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. HBO Romania’s representatives told FNE that that the channel will respect the wishes of its subscribers and will make sure that from now on Rogue One: A Star Wars Story has its original audio and Romanian subtitles. HBO Romania might also stop dubbing other titles.

CASTiNG, one of the few Romanian online original series to date, started broadcasting on YouTube on 14 December 2017. Its first episode has had 22,000 views to date. CASTiNG’s premiere came shortly after the launch on YouTube of another domestic series, Lara directed by Ciprian Iacob and produced by Mixton Movie, which has had 2.1 m viewers for its first episode from September 2017 to date.

Unlike Lara, a children and youth series played by non-professional actors, CASTiNG is a professional enterprise made with a budget of 30,000 EUR and a crew of 40 people. The production company Diud is already planning the second season and more online shows. The eight episodes are directed by young directors Millo Simulov, Andrei Gheorghe, Florin Babei, Iliana Dumitrache, Roxana Andrei and Andrei Ion.

CONTACTS:

ROMANIAN FILM CENTRE
4-6, Dem. I. Dobrescu street, sector 1, Bucharest
Phone: +40 213 104 301
Fax: + 40 213 104 300
www.cnc.gov.ro
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THE MINISTRY OF CULTURE AND NATIONAL IDENTITY
22, Bulevardul Unirii, sector 3, Bucharest
Press office: +40 212 243 947
www.cultura.ro 
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Charleston aka Charlton Heston by Andrei Crețulescu, credit: Adi MarineciFILMMAKERS’S UNION (UCIN)
28-30 Mendeleev, sector 1, Bucharest
Phone: +40 213 168 0 83, +40 213 168 0 84
Fax: + 40 213 111 246
www.ucin.ro 
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ROMANIAN FILM PROMOTION
52 Popa Soare street, sector 2, Bucharest
Phone: + 40 213 266 480
Fax: + 40 213 260 268
www.romfilmpromotion.ro 
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ROMANIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE
38 Aleea Alexandru
Sector 1, 011824
Bucharest, Romania
Phone: (+4) 031 71 00 627, (+4) 031 71 00 606
Fax: (+4) 031 71 00 607
www.icr.ro 
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MEDIADESK ROMANIA
57 Barbu Delavrancea street, et. 1, sector 1, Bucharest
Phone / Fax: +40 213 166 060, +40 213 166 061
www.media-romania.eu 
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Report by Iulia Blaga
Sources: the Romanian Film Center - CNC, cinemagia.ro

 

MARKET ANALYSIS 2017

The Line by Peter BebjakSlovak films set box office records in domestic cinemas in 2017. The attendance of nearly 1.5 m admissions was the strongest in the history of independent Slovakia, since 1993.

One of the most successful films in 2017 was the crime-thriller The Line / Čiara, directed by Peter Bebjak, which together with the romantic comedy All or Nothing / Všetko alebo nič directed by Marta Ferencová,  topped the 300,000 admission mark.

The political thriller Kidnapping / Únos, directed by Mariana Čengel Solčanská, had almost 300,000 admissions.

Ten projects registered for the 20% cash rebate at the Slovak Audiovisual Fund in 2017, including the fourth season of the Netflix 13-episode series Outlander. The eased requierements implemented in 2017 attracted more international projects than in 2016, when four projects applied for incentives.

The Slovak Audovisual Fund together with the Ministry of Culture of the Slovak Republic decided to make major cuts to the requirements for minimum expenditure for international productions applying to the incentive scheme and launched a National Film Agency in August 2017 to work with incoming foreign productions.

The Outlander series by Julian HolmesPRODUCTION

A total of 27 feature length films were shot in Slovakia in 2017: 21 feature films (including 14 minority coproductions) and six documentaries (including two minority coproductions).  No long animated film was produced in 2017.

The 100% Slovak productions include the political thriller and box office hit Kidnapping / Únos, directed by Mariana Čengel Solčanská and produced by JMB Film & TV Production in coproduction with RTVS and Studio 727; the comedy Cuky Luky Film, directed by Karel Janák and produced by noemo; DOGG, directed by Jonáš Karásek, Enrik Bistika, Slavomír Zrebný and Vilo Csino, and  produced by Azyl Production and HomeMedia Production; the documentary Ťažká duša / Heavy Heart, directed by Marek Šulík and produced by Žudro, the Slovak Academy of Sciences and RTVS; the family musical comedy Spievankovo a kráľovná Harmónia / Spievankovo and Queen Harmony, directed by Diana Novotná and produced by Tonada and RTVS, and the documentary Vábenie výšok / Addicted to Altitude, directed by Pavol Barabáš and produced by K2 Studio in coproduction with RTVS.

After a long break since 2011, the acclaimed Slovak director Martin Šulík shot his new feature The Interpreter / Tlmočník, a Slovak/Czech/Austrian coproduction between Titanic production, In Film, coop99RTVS and the Czech Television. The film will have its world premiere at the Berlinale and will be released in March 2018.

Censor by Peter KerekesOther important coproductions shot in 2017 are: Cellar / Pivnica, directed by Igor Voloshin and produced by Slovakia’s Furia Film in coproduction with the Czech company 8heads production, Russia’s Gate LCC and RTVS; Power / Moc, directed by Mátyás Prikler and produced by MPhilms in coproduction with Czech Negativ and Hungary's Proton Cinema and Belgian Les Films du Carré; the Slovak/Czech coproduction Censor / Cenzorka, directed by Peter Kerekes and produced by Punkchart films, Hypermarket Film and Peter Kerekes, and also Juraj Jakubisko’s fairytale Seven Legged Lucas / Sedmonohý Lukáš, produced by the Czech and Slovak branches of J&J Jakubisko Film Europe in coproduction with TV JOJ.

Katarína Kerekesová, the director of the children animated series Mimi and Lisa / Mimi a Líza (Fool Moon), introduced a new animated series in 2017. The Websters / Websterovci is the first Slovak animated series in 3D and is a coproduction between Fool Moon, RTVS and Polish Studio Miniatur Filmowych. This Slovak/Polish coproduction was broadcast on RTVS during the 2017 Christmas holidays. 

In 2016 four projects applied for cash rebates and two of them stepped into production in 2017. The TV mini-series Mária Terézia / Maria Theresia, a Slovak/Czech/Austrian/Hungarian coproduction directed by Robert Dornhelm and produced by Beta Film (Germany), MR Film (Austria) and Maya Production (CZ) in coproduction with the Slovak RTVS, the Czech TV, the Austrian ORF and the Hungarian MTVA, was released during the Christmas holidays.

The 13-part TV miniseries Inšpektor Max / Inspector Max, directed by Jaroslav Brabec and produced by Slovakia’s Trigon Production in coproduction with the Slovak RTVS and the Czech Television, was shot and finished in 2017, with the release set for January 2018.

The Websters by Katarina KerekesovaAccording to Martin Šmatlák, the Director of AVF, three times more projects applied for the 20% cash rebate in 2017 compared to 2016. They will be shot throughout 2018. The fourth season of the 13-episode series Outlander, directed by the British Julian Holmes and produced by Netflix, will be shot in Slovakia for 30 days, as well as the US/Czech/Slovak coproduction Alleraya – The Falcon Princess, directed by Slovak Palo Janík Jr. (with  Filmpark production applying for rebates), InOut Studio’s 12-episode series Mistresses / Zamilované directed by Jakub Kroner, The Magic Quill  / Čertovské pero, directed by Marek Najbrt and produced by Czech Punk Film in coproduction with Trigon ProductionRTVS, the Czech Television, Magic Lab, Michal Bauer and Barrandov Studios, and the three-episode miniseries directed by Peter Krištúfek and produced by PubRes in coproduction with Czech Evolution Films and T.H.A.

Also benefitting from the rebates are Villa Lucia, directed by Michal Kollár and produced by KFS Production, RTVS and Czech Fog‘n’Desire FilmsDubček, directed by Laco Halama and produced by Filmpark production in coproduction with RTVS and the Czech Television; The General / Generál, a film and a three-episode miniseries directed by Mariana Čengel Solčanská and produced by JMB Film & TV Productions in coproduction with Prague Film Production, and Šťastné zviera, directed by Jozef Slovák, produced by Tatra Star and starring Ivan Trojan.

Slovakia’s 20% incentive scheme established in 2015 eased its requirements in August 2017. The minimum expenditure level was cut from 2 m EUR to 150,000 EUR for a single feature, documentary or animated film (with a minimum length of 70 minutes), and to 300,000 EUR for a project involving at least two such films or a television series (maximum 13 episodes of minimum 40 minutes).

All or Nothing by Marta FerencováDISTRIBUTION

A total of 31 domestic long films had their premiere in 2017, including 14 minority coproductions as well as nine long documentaries (including three minority coproductions), two middle-length documentaries, one long animated film produced as Slovak minority coproduction and two animated short films.

The leader in the distribution of Slovak films is the Association of Slovak Film Clubs (ASFK), which released three domestic majority coproductions: Out, directed by Gyorgy Kristóf and produced by sentimentalfilm in coproduction with Mirage Film StudioFilm Angels Studioendorfilm, KMH Film, Punkchart FilmsRTVSFAMUFilm Angels Prods; Diera v hlave / A Hole in the Head, directed by Robert Kirchhoff  and produced by HITCHHIKER Cinema in coproduction with the Czech TelevisionRTVS, atelier.doc and Addicted to Altitude directed by Pavol Barabáš, as well as four minority coproductions: Ice Mother  / Baba z Ledu, directed by Bohdan Sláma and produced by  Negativ, in coproduction with the French Why Not Productions, Slovak ARTILERIA , the Czech television RTVSBarrandov Studiosi/o post; Spoor / Pokot, directed by Agnieszka Holland and Kasia Adamik, and produced by TOR Film Production in coproduction with Heimatfilm GmbH, Chimney Group, Nutprodukce, nutprodukcia; Little Crusader / Křižáček, directed by Václav Kadrnka and produced by Sirius Films in coproduction with ARTILERIA , the Czech TelevisionBarrandov Studioi/o post, and Wolf from the Royal Vineyard Street / Vlk z Kráľovských Vinohrad, directed by Jan Němec and produced by MasterFilm in coproduction with the Czech TelevisionMedia Film, UPP and French Bocalupo Films.

Continental Film, a big distributor mostly of Hollywood productions, is also an important player in distributing domestic titles. In 2017 it released All or Nothing / Všetko alebo nič, directed by Marta Ferencová and produced by NUNEZ NFE s.r.o. in coproduction with Evita Film Production s.r.o. and MOJO Film s.r.o., Kidnapping directed by Mariana Čengel Solčanská, DOGG directed by Jonáš Karásek, Enrik Bistika, Slavomír Zrebný and Vilo Csino and The Third Wish / Tri želania, directed by Vít Karas and produced by the Czech Television in coproduction with Slovak TV Markíza and Promea Communication.

Kidnapping by Mariana Čengel SolčanskáForum Film released Oddsockeaters / Lichožrúti, directed by Galina Miklinova and produced by Total HelpArt - T.H.A. in coproduction with the Czech TelevisionPubResAlkay Animation PragueFilmosaurus Rex; Filthy / Špina, directed by Tereza Nvotová and produced by Moloko Film and BFILM) , Barefoot / Po strništi bos, directed by Jan Svěrák and produced by Biograf Jan Svěrák in coproduction with the Czech Televisioninnogy, Phoenix Film, NovinskiRTVS; Garden Store: The Family Friend  / Záhradníctvo: Rodinný priateľ,  directed by Jan Hřebejk and produced by Fog'n'Desire Films in coproduction with the Czech Television, MD4, Sokol Kollár, KFS Production, RTVSBarrandov Studiosinnogy, HN film, Magic Lab, ROZVID, EUROPE Visual Consulting, Chimney Group; Garden Store: Deserter / Záhradníctvo: Dezertér, directed by by Jan Hřebejk  and produced by Fog'n'Desire Films in coproduction with the Czech Television, MD4, Sokol Kollar, KFS Production, and Garden Store: Suitor  / Záhradníctvo: Nápadník, directed by Jan Hřebejk and produced by Fog'n'Desire Films in coproduction with the Czech Television, MD4, Sokol Kollar, KFS Production and CinemArt.

Itafilm released two titles in 2017: Cuky Luky Film by Karel Janák and Spievankovo and Queen Harmony directed by Diana Novotná.

PubRes released two documentaries: The Lust for Power / Mečiar, directed by Tereza Nvotová and produced by PubRes in coproduction with HBO Europe and Negativ, and Červená, directed by Olga Sommerová and produced by Czech Evolution Films in coproduction with MuMo, PubRes and the Czech Television.

The young platform Filmtopia, which was launched in 2012, began distributing domestic films also on the web portal DAFilms. In 2017 Filmtopia distributed the documentaries Heavy Heart directed by Marek Šulík, Hotel Sunrise / Hotel Úsvit, directed by Mária Rumanová and produced by Punkchart Films in coproduction with RTVS, FTF VŠMU and kaleidoscope, and Varga, directed by Soňa Maletzová and produced by Punkchart Films, RTVS, the Czech Television and FAMU.

Film Europe Media Company released Nina, directed by Juraj Lehotský and produced by Punkchart Films in coproduction with Lehotsky Film, sentimentalfilm, RTVS, Czech Television and endorfilm.

Wolf from the Royal Vineyard Street by Jan NemecCinemArt released Little Harbour /  Piata loď, directed by Iveta Grófová and produced by Hulapa film, Ltd. in coproduction with endorfilm,  Katapult Film, Silverart and RTVS, Garfield Film released A Prominent Patient / Masaryk by Julius Ševčík and produced by IN Film Praha in coproduction with the Czech Television, ZDF/ARTE, RTVS, and Bontonfilm released The White World According to Daliborek / Svet podľa Daliborka, directed by Vít Klusák and produced by Hypermarket Film in coproduction with Peter Kerekes, the Czech Television and BRITDOC Foundation.

There is little Slovak participation in VOD platforms, although a lot of documentaries can be found on DAFilms. The main platform for Slovak films is Kinocola, while ASFK VOD, a VOD platform launched by the Association of Slovak Distributors in 2015, is handling international and domestic titles. Private Slovak television Markíza also releases its domestic series on Voyo.

According to Martin Šmatlák, 2017 was unique also in terms of participation in A-listed festivals. Slovak majority productions winning prizes in 2017 are: Little Harbour by Iveta Grófová - Generation KPlus prize at the Berlinale, The Line / Čiara, directed by Peter Bebjak and produced by Wandal Production in coproduction with Ukraine‘s Garnet International Media Group, RTVSHomeMedia Production and Martin Kohút - best director at the Karlovy Vary IFF, Nina by Juraj Lehotský - Bronze Pyramid  at the Cairo IFF.

Also, the Slovak/Czech/Hungarian coproduction Out by Gyorgy Kristóf  had its premiere in Cannes’ Un Certain Regard, Filthy by Tereza Nvotová had its world premiere at Rotterdam’s Bright Future and the German/Slovak coproduction Freedom / Sloboda directed by Jan Speckenbach (produced by German ONE TWO FILMS, ZAK Film Production and Slovakia‘s BFILM) had its world premiere at the Locarno IFF.

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

By the end of 2017, Slovakia had 149 cinemas with 246 screens, of which 189 screens were already digitalised. They also include five alternative spaces for film screenings and 21 open-air theatres. Compared to 2016, the number of cinemas increased from 138 to 149 and the number of digitalised screens increased from 185 to 189. Slovakia also has one IMAX cinema, which was opened in 2015.

Little Harbor by Iveta GrofovaSeveral small art house cinemas operate in Bratislava. Kino Lumière, operated by the Slovak Film Institute, opened on the site of the former Charlie’s Centrum in September 2011. MladosťNostalgia and Film Europe Cinema also add to the diversity of Bratislava's art house landscape, together with Kino Klap (located in the Academy of Performing Arts), Foajé and Kino Inak (a screening room hosted by the alternative cultural centre A4).

A new programme of support for Slovak films in domestic cinemas was launched in 2016. Every cinema has the right to apply and receive one euro per each ticket sold for a domestic title. In 2016 the AVF alloted 217,488 EUR for 2015 and in 2017 it allotted 188,048 EUR for 2016. Due to the rapid increase of admissions in 2017, AVF had to change the regulations for 2018.

Total admissions in 2017 were 6,692,871 representing a 18.10 percent increase compared to 2016. Total gross was 34,513,049 EUR, which is 18.91 percent higher than in 2016.

Total admissions to Slovak films and coproduction titles released in 2017 were 1,430,504 and total gross was 7,201,048 EUR. Admissions to Slovak productions represents 21.37% of all released titles. In 2016 domestic titles had only 6.6% attendance from among all the released titles.

According to the Union of Film Distributors of the Slovak Republic (UFD ), the romantic comedy All or Nothing by Marta Ferencová was the most popular film in 2017 with 340,535 admissions, followed by The Line by Peter Bebjak with 329,349 admissions. In 2016 the most popular domestic title was the Czech/Slovak/Polish coproduction The Red Captain / Červený kapitán, directed by Michal Kollár and  produced by Fog´n Desire Films, in coproduction with Sokol Kollár, MD4, RTVS, Czech Television, Barrandov Studio, S Pro Alfa, Krakow Festival Office, and Kino 64 U hradeb, with 86,000 admissions.

All or Nothing is followed in the admissions top ten for domestic films by Kidnapping directed by Mariana Čengel Solčanská with 278,763 admissions, Cuky Luky Film directed by Karel Janák with 116,139 admissions, Spievankovo and Queen Harmony directed by Diana Novotná with 86,555 admissions, A Prominent Patient directed by Július Ševčík with 55,183 admissions, Filthy directed by Tereza Nvotová with 50,564 admissions, Barefoot directed by Jan Svěrák with 41,203 admissions, the animated film Oddsockeaters directed by Galina Miklínová with 20,214 admissions and the documentary The Lust for Power directed by Tereza Nvotová with 15,621 admissions.

A Prominent Patient by Július ŠevčíkGRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

The Slovak Audiovisual Fund has been the main tool of public support for cinematography in the Slovak Republic since 2010. Its budget was 6.9 m EUR in 2010, but fell to 5.5 m EUR in 2013 and increased again to 6.6 m EUR in 2014. The fund had a budget of 7 m EUR in 2017.  

The budget of AVF is provided in part by TV advertising revenues. In 2017, AVF registered ten projects for audiovisual industry support.

Slovakia’s 20% incentive scheme established in 2015 eased its requirements starting August 2017. The minimum expenditure level was cut from 2 m EUR to 150,000 EUR for a single feature, documentary or animated film (with a minimum length of 70 minutes) and to 300,000 EUR for a project involving at least two such films or a television series (maximum 13 episodes of minimum 40 minutes).

The Slovak Audovisual Fund together with the Ministry of Culture of the Slovak Republic launched a National Film Agency in August 2017, aiming to work with incoming foreign productions.

In January 2017 the development grants increased from 3,000 EUR to a maximum of 5,000 EUR. Maximum grant for festivals increased from 200,000 EUR to 300,000 EUR per festival. Films and TV projects are now judged separately.

With a new legislation, animated films are included in the production grants contest for Slovak minority coproductions, and TV animated projects are preferred. Slovak majority productions can apply for development and production support, which have a cap of 50,000 EUR for development and 1.2 m EUR for production. The significant new element of allotting funding to minority TV productions with minority Slovak coproduction was successfully lobbied for by the Slovak Association of Animated Film Producers (APAF). 

The Interpreter by Martin SulikAnother novelty is that one project cannot receive more than three grants from the Slovak Audiovisual Fund. However, minority coproductions and student films can receive only one grant from the AVF.

A new funding scheme of the Bratislava Self-Governing Region was launched in 2015 for supporting the culture in the region. In 2017 the scheme supported the distribution of Nina by Juraj Lehotský, The Line by Peter Bebjak, Little Harbour by Iveta Grófová and Filthy by Tereza Nvotová.

The primary sources of information on film are the Slovak Film Institute, which will celebrate its 55th anniversary in 2018, and the National Cinematographic Centre, through the specialised office of the Audiovisual Information Centre.

The Magic Quill by Marek Najbrt, photo: Punk Film / Marek NovotnýTV

Slovakia is unique in the CEE as home of the only channel devoted exclusively to European films. Film Europe Channel was developed by Film Europe Media Company, which launched two more channels, Československo HD and Festival Channel HD in November 2016, in addition to Film Europe Channel HD.

The channel operates in Slovakia along with the public broadcaster RTVS and commercial broadcasters MAC TV - Slovenská produkčná since January 2017 (with channels: TV JOJPLUSWAUJOJ CinemaRiKŤuki TV, JOJ Family) and Markiza Slovakia (with channels: TV MarkízaTV DomaDajto).

CONTACTS:

SLOVAK AUDIOVISUAL FUND
Director: Martin Šmatlák
Grösslingová 53
SK-811 09, Bratislava
Phone: +421 5923 4545
Fax: +421 5923 4461
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.avf.sk

The Cellar by Igor VoloshinSLOVAK FILM INSTITUTE
General Director: Peter Dubecký
Phone: +421 2 5710 1503
Fax: +421 2 5296 3461

Audiovisual Information Center: Miroslav Ulman
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.sfu.sk

NATIONAL CINEMATOGRAPHIC CENTRE
Director: Rastislav Steranka
Contact person: Lea Pagáčová
Phone: +421 2 5710 1526
Tel/fax: +421 2 5273 3214
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.aic.sk

RADIO AND TELEVISION OF SLOVAKIA
Mlynská dolina
845 45 Bratislava
Phone: +421 2 6061 1103
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 
www.rtvs.sk

Report by Alexandra Gabrižová (2018)
Sources: the Slovak Film Institute, the Slovak Audiovisual Fund, the Union of Film Distributors of the Slovak Republic

 

Let Him Be a Basketball Player by Boris PetkovičMARKET ANALYSIS 2017

There were no major changes in 2017 in terms of general admissions in Slovenian cinemas, as well as film production and grants awarded by the Slovenian Film Centre.

More Slovenian titles were released, but the audience’s interest in domestic films decreased by approximately five percent, which is still above the last five years’ average.

The new cash rebate scheme for foreign productions has shown its first results, while the new film law is still pending.

PRODUCTION

The list of feature films which started production or preproduction in 2017 includes: Zadušnica, directed by Matjaž Ivanišin and produced by Staragara; Polsestra, directed by Damjan Kozole and produced by Vertigo; Ne pozabi dihati, directed by Martin Turk and produced by Bela film; Vsi proti vsem, directed by Andrej Košak and produced by Blade production; Night Quartet / Nočni kvartet, directed by Vinko Möderndorfer and produced by Forum Ljubljana; Once Were Humans / Nekoč so bili ljudje, directed by Goran Vojnović and produced by Arsmedia; Corporation / Korporacija, directed by Matej Nahtigal and produced by Lignit film; Two Riders / Jezdeca, directed by Dominik Mencej and produced by Staragara; Inventory / Inventura, directed by Darko Sinko and produced by December.History of Love by Sonja Prosenc

The following feature films are expected to be completed in 2018: History of Love / Zgodovina ljubezni, directed by Sonja Prosenc and produced by MonoO; My Last Year as a Loser / Ne bom več luzerka by Urša Menart and I Am Frank / Jaz sem Frenk by Metod Pevec, both produced by Vertigo; Consequences / Posledice, directed by Darko Štante and produced by Temporama; Gaja’s World / Gajin svet, directed by Peter Bratuša and produced by Felina; Stories from Chestnut Woods / Zgodbe iz kostanjevih gozdov, directed by Gregor Božič and produced by Nosorogi.

The following long documentaries will be completed in 2018: This Work is Public Property / To delo je v javni lasti, directed by Amir Muratović and produced by Cebram; Krvno maščevanje, directed by Marija Zidar and produced by Vertigo; Nikita, directed by Siniša Gačić and produced by Studio Maj and Ballandi Arts; Vlado, directed by Miran Zupanič and produced by Arsmedia, and iOtok, directed by Miha Čelar and produced by Astral.

Eva Jesenovec and Urša Menart - My Last Year as a Loser by Ursa Menart; credit: Vertigo; photo by Zeljko StevanicThe introduction of a 25% cash rebate scheme in autumn of 2016, expected to increase the interest of foreign productions in Slovenia, has shown its first results. Three foreign projects which benefited from the scheme, getting a total support of 650,000 EUR, are filmed in Slovenia: the UK/German/Belgian trilogy Intrigo (serviced by Pakt Media d.o.o.), the Korean Black Knight (serviced by Nora Production) and the Irish Belly of the Whale (serviced by Slovenian branches of Nukleus film). All of them were shot in 2017.

Slovenia has also become popular with Indian filmmakers, as feature films Spyder / Sambhavami, directed by A. R. Murugadoss and starring well-known Indian actor Mahesh Babu, and Vivegam / Thala 57, directed by the Siruthai Siva and starring Ajith Kumar and Kajal Aggarwal, were partly shot in Slovenia in spring and summer of 2017, with Azaleja Global servicing for both of them.

The Miner by Hanna SlakDISTRIBUTION

Due to the fact that many projects from the previous year(s) were delayed, more domestic films were released in 2017. Slovenian producers usually produce around 10 feature films and documentaries per year, and are more and more focused on coproductions, especially with other ex-Yugoslavian producers. Foreign producers’ share in the investments in Slovenian majority projects has come close to a relatively high number of 30 percent.

The national television RTV Slovenija still plays a key role in the domestic production, making up to five feature and documentary films per year and acting as a regular coproducer.

In 2017 eighteen Slovenian films were completed, including 12 feature films and six documentaries. Most of them were screened at the annual showcase of Slovenian film, the Slovenian Film Festival in Portorož, and were already domestically released by the end of 2017. The rest of them will be released in 2018.

Ksana by Dejan BabosekThe feature films completed in 2017 are: Let Him Be a Basketball Player / Košarkar naj bo, directed by Boris Petkovič and produced by Gustav Film; Ksana / Ksana, directed by Dejan Babosek and produced by Narayan Production; A Dream / Privid, directed by Boštjan Slatenšek and produced by FilRouge; Slovenia, Australia and Tomorrow the World / Slovenija, Avstralija in jutri ves svet, directed by Marko Naberšnik and produced by Perfo Production; Ivan / Ivan, directed by Janez Burger and produced by Staragara; The Basics of Killing / Družinica, directed by Jan Cvitkovič and produced by Perfo Production; The Miner / Rudar, directed by Hanna Slak and produced by Nukleus Film; Sly Foxes / Stekle lisice, directed by Boris Jurjaševič and produced by RTV Slovenija; Perseverance / Vztrajanje, directed by Miha Knific and produced by Nukleus Film; Erased / Izbrisana, directed  by Miha Mazzini and produced by Gustav Film; Mesto svetlobe, directed by Marko Kumer Murč and produced by EnaBanda; and Igram, sem, directed by Mirsolav Mandić and produced by Filmostovje.

The documentaries completed in 2017 are: The Family / Družina, directed by Rok Biček and produced by Cvinger film; Codelli / Codelli, directed by Miha Čelar and produced by Astral film; The Last Ice Hunters / Zadnji ledeni lovci, directed by Jure Breceljnik and Rožle Bregar, and produced by FilmIT; Charlatan Magnifique, directed by Maja Pavlin and produced by RTV Slovenija; They Were Tito's Towns / Bila so Titova mesta, directed by Amir Muratović and produced by RTV Slovenija; Every Good Story Is a Love Story / Vsaka dobra zgodba je ljubezenska zgodba, directed by Matjaž Ivanišin and Rajko Grlić and produced by Vertigo.

Codelli by Miha CelarThe most significant awards for Slovenian films in 2017 are: the Vesna Award for best film at the 20th Slovenian Film Festival and the Critics Week Award at the Locarno Film Festival 2017 for Biček's The Family; six Vesna Awards (best feature film, best actress, script, cinematography, music, make-up) for Burger's Ivan; four Vesna Awards (DoP, music, costume design, sound) and best actress award at the Montreal Film Festival for Cvitković’s The Basics of Killing; three Vesna Awards (supporting actor, supporting actress, best original AV work) for Knific’s Perseverance; three Vesna Awards (best director, best actor, best editing) and the special jury mention at the 33rd Warsaw Film Festival for Hanna Slak's The Miner.

Špela Čadež won several international prizes, including the grand prix awards at the Netherland Animation Film Festival, at the Bucheon International Animation Festival and at the 27th Animafest Zagreb, for her short animated film Nighthawk / Nočna ptica produced by Fint.

Nighthawk by Spela CadezMatjaž Ivanišin won the Georges de Beauregard award at the International Film Festival Marseille for his medium-length documentary Playing Man produced by Restart.

A total of 178 films were distributed in Slovenian cinemas in 2017, of which around 55% were US productions, 38% European and from other countries, while the domestic productions and coproductions represented approximately 7%.

In 2017 the leading distribution company was Karantanija Cinemas d.o.o., followed by Blitz Film & Video Distribution. Both distribute mostly commercial films from major Hollywood studios such as Warner Bros, 20th Century Fox, Universal and Paramount. The official representatives of two major US distribution companies are from Croatia: Walt Disney’s distribution in Slovenia is represented by 2i Film and Sony Columbia’s by Croatian Continental Film.

The Last Ice Hunters by Jure Breceljnik and Rožle BregarSome smaller distribution companies, such as Cinemania Group d.o.o., Cenex d.o.o., Demiurg and Fivia, distribute independent, domestic and European films.

EXHIBITION AND BOX OFFICE

Slovenian cinema admissions are usually around 2 m per year. There are 50 operating cinemas with 111 screens, of which 95 are digitalised, according to official statistics from 2016.

Most of the Slovenian attendance is generated by multiplexes in bigger cities, owned by two major multiplex chains: Kolosej Kinematografi and Cineplexx. While Cineplexx operates six multiplexes in Maribor, Celje, Kranj, Koper, Murska Sobota and Novo mesto, Kolosej Kinematografi runs the biggest multiplex in the capital city of Ljubljana and a smaller one in Kranj.

Perseverance by Miha KnificOne of the two multiplexes in Maribor, previously operated by Kolosej kinematografi, now operates under the name Maribox, and is owned by the company Projektor d.o.o. Other cinema theatres try to balance commercial and art house films.

Slovenian admissions in 2017 dropped to approximately 2.306 m (compared to 2.34 m in 2016), while total box office was approximately 11.6 m EUR (compared to 11.9 m EUR in 2016).

In 2017 just one title crossed the line of 100,000 admissions (there were two in 2016), the animated feature Despicable Me 3, followed by Fifty Shades Darker, The Fate of the Furious, the domestic teen comedy Let Him Be a Basketball Player and the US animated feature The Boss Baby. The rest of the top ten includes: Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, Smurfs: The Lost Village , Star Wars: The Last Jedi, Baywatch and La La Land.

Charlatan Magnifique by Maja PavlinFifteen Slovenian films, ten of them supported by the Slovenian Film Centre (SFC), were released in cinemas in 2017. Total domestic admissions were 163,774 (compared to 230,851 in 2016) and box office was 617,452 EUR, representing approximately eight percent of the total admissions (it was 10% in 2016 and just 2% in 2015) and little less than six percent of the total annual box office.

Top five domestic titles in 2017 are: Let Him Be a Basketball Player, directed by Boris Petkovič and produced by Gustav Film, with 78,041 admissions, At Hostar by Luka Marčetić (produced by Kerlc Film in coproduction with Iridum Film) with 31,937 admissions, Militia 2 by Sašo Đukić, produced by Franci Kek and Tadej Klapš, with 11,259 admissions, Come Along, directed by Igor Šterk and produced by A.A.C. Productions, with 9,554 admissions, and Awakenings, directed by Peter Bratuša and produced by Felina, with 8,239 admissions.

Come Along by Igor ŠterkThe Slovenian film with the most admissions since 1991 is At Hostar / Pr’ Hostar by Luka Marčetić with 211,604 admissions (179.667 admissions in 2016 and 31,937 admissions in 2017), followed by Going Our Way / Gremo mi po svoje (directed by Miha Hočevar and produced by Vertigo/Emotionfilm, 2010) with 205,439 admissions.

The 28th edition of the Ljubljana International Film Festival LIFFe, organised by Cankarjev dom, generated 43,000 admissions and screened 97 long and 17 short films from 43 countries from 8 to 19 November 2017.

 

They Were Titos Towns by Amir MuratovićGRANTS AND NEW LEGISLATION

The main film institution in Slovenia is the Slovenian Film Centre (SFC), a public agency established in 2011 and replacing the Slovenian Film Fund. Its goal is to encourage creativity by providing suitable conditions for audiovisual activities.

The SFC supports national film production, postproduction, distribution and film festivals. In theory, its funding sources should come from the state budget, the agency’s own income, collaboration with international organisations, donations and sponsorships. In practice, the majority of its funding is in the form of a subsidy from the Ministry of Culture, with the amount depending on the annual budget of the country.

The Basics of Killing by Ian CvitkovičSince its launch, the SFC has been involved in the production of 80% of domestic films with an average funding support of over 50% per project. The SFC provided 4.434 m EUR for film production in 2017 and approximately the same amount is secured for 2018.

The managing director of the SFC is Nataša Bučar, appointed in December 2016.

The new film law is still pending, however in September 2016 some changes to the legislation governing the funding of the SFC were made and a new 25% cash rebate scheme for foreign production was introduced.

In 2017 the Slovenian Film Centre announced 13 public tenders and awarded grants totalling 3,836,300 EUR (3.95 m EUR in 2016). The results of three of them (minority coproductions, development, investment stimulation for AV production) have not yet been announced at the beginning of 2018.

A total of 2.603 m EUR went to film production (production, debut features, coproductions), 574,000 EUR went to audiovisual projects, 100,000 EUR to student films and 40,000 EUR to script and project development.

Sly Foxes by Boris JurjaševićA total of 73,900 EUR was allotted to festivals, 155,400 EUR for film education and 30,000 EUR for professional education.

In 2017 the SFC also started the project Our Films At Home, aiming at promoting domestic films among the Slovenian audience.

Other sources of support originate from coproductions, services backed by the state and provided by FS Viba film studio in the form of technical assistance, international film funds and institutions.

Slovenia Australia and Tomorrow the World by Marko NabersnikTV

In the last few years, according to the Law on the Slovenian Film Centre, the public broadcaster RTV Slovenia has been obliged to invest in independent projects.

In 2017, the leading commercial TV Pro plus with its five channels (POP TV, KANAL A, KINO, BRIO and OTO) kept its leading position with news, foreign programming, reality shows, local TV series and sporting events, followed by the national television RTV Slovenija with its three national channels, and the commercial television Planet TV.

Every Good Story Is a Love Story by Matjaž Ivanišin and Rajko GrlićOther significant players are foreign cable TV channels Fox Group, Cas Media, HBO Europe and several ex-Yugoslavian TV channels.

Prime time on Slovenian television is generally held by news (Dnevnik, 24 ur, Planet Danes), reality and entertainment shows (Slovenia Got Talent, Your Voice Sounds Familiar, Dancing with the Stars, Masterchef, Gostilna išče šefa, Farm, Biggest Looser, Vse je mogoče) and domestic fiction (Ena žlahnta štorija, Usodno vino, Reka ljubezni), most of them produced by Pro plus and Planet TV.

In 2017 a few non-English language fiction programmes, like the German TV series Mountain Medic / The Bergdoktor and a Turkish TV series, also had a significant share.

While Planet TV launched the last, sixth season of the TV series Ena žlahtna štorija, directed by Aleš Žemlja, Boris Petkovič, Jaka Šuligoj and Marko Cafnik, Pro plus successfully finished the fourth season of Usodno vino and has started a new domestic TV series Reka ljubezni directed by Nejc Levstik and Jaka Šuligoj, produced by Perfo Production, in Autumn.

CONTACTS:

SLOVENIAN FILM CENTRE
Miklošiceva 38
SI - 1000 Ljubljana
Phone: +386 (0)1 23 43 200
Fax: +386 (0)1 23 43 219
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.film-center.si

SLOVENIA FILM COMMISSION
Miklošičeva 38
SI - 1000 Ljubljana
Phone: +386 (0)3 23 43 200
Fax: +386 (0)1 23 43 219
Mojca Planšak, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.film-center.siA Dream by Boštjan Slatenšek

MINISTRY OF CULTURE OF REPUBLIC OF SLOVENIA
Maistrova ulica 10
SI - 1000 Ljubljana
Phone: +386 (0)1 369 59 00
Fax: +386 (0)1 369 59 01
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.mk.gov.si

FS VIBA
Stegne 5
SI - 1000 Ljubljana
Phone: + 386 (0)1 5132 402
Fax: + 386 (0)1 5132 550
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
www.vibafilm.si

Report by Damijan Vinter (2018)
Sources:the  Slovenian Film Centre, the Ministry of Culture